(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Cycle"

"Care' 1 





FITCHBURG STATE COLLEGE STUDENT NEWSPAPER 



VOL. 5 NO. 5 



DECEMBER 1, 1972 



What's Happening, 




by LARRY ANTIL 

By democratic vote (I got voted down) 
"Care" was chosen as the theme by 
the "Old Fogy's" Exceptional Child class 
for a project he instigated in a last 
ditch effort to add a little humanity 
to this campus. This suave, silver- 
haired gentleman, alias Dr. Goldman 
Head of the Special Education Depart- 
ment, does not have a plan to hide 
''the pit" or hide the entire college 
for that matter, but he does have a 
plan to cover those ghastly, new parti- 
tions in the Special Ed. office in Edger- 

• Iy with great pieces of art. Where, you 
may ask is this artwork to come from? 

"Why from the vast and idle talented 
of our very own college. If I may be 
more precise the plan is as follows. 
There is to be a picture painting contest 
taking the theme of "Care" in which 
all may enter. The paintings will be 
about 5 feet by 3 feet on the supplied 
paper using your own paints. All entries 
should be in by the 11th to the 13th 
of December so that they may be judged 
by an impartial committee. The best 



of the paintings will be hung on the 
Special Ed. office partitions. Rewards 
will be inner ones for the winners will 
know that they have not only added an 
esthetic touch to the campus but also 
a little something for the inhabitants 
of the cells in the Special Education 
office to look at in their (cough) leisure. 
If, after reading the above, you are 
consumed by a burning desire to rank 
among the greats of Rod Sterling's 
"Night Gallery" be looking for more 
information on the bulletin boards or 
(if I should get it) in the Cycle. 
L. Antil 

P,S, Those of you who are in the sopho- 
more class and are Special Ed. majors 
will be getting threatening notes in 
your mail boxes pertaining to a meeting 
the 30th of November, All-College 
Period. If you should eat, burn, or 
throw this notice on the floor, there 
will be more information concerning the 
meeting in the next Cycle. 



Business Vs Morality Vs The 
Courts The Term Paper 



by JOHN G' ORGE 

If you were one of the 750 babies 
that attended the John B. Sebastian 
concert, than you know what's happening. 
For you wlio don't, I'll try and tell you! 
I walked into Weston Aud. and was 
quite puzzled when I saw the stage, On 
it was a fake fireplace (the kind you 
see in the 5 & 10 at Christmas time), 
a light blue easy chair and in the 
background, a set of drums and a nume- 
rous number of amplifiers of various 
shapes, sizes and wattages. Suddenly 
the show starts and out pops this 
character by the name of Marty Mull. 
He walks on stage wearing an ivy league 
suit with white gloves and a pair of 
M.'ckey Mouse shoes. He takes off the 
gloves in a manner that only Amy 
Vanderbuilt could love and goes into 
his first number. My first response was 
"This guy must be joking". When he 
finished, the audience applauded but 
each was saying to themselve" the things 
you nave to listen to to see John Se- 
bastian". Marty then started joking with 
the audience. He tells them about his 
new album and how he would like to play 
a song from it. He then proceeds to take 
out an album and points to the song on 
the record and says 'I'd like to play 
this one". He was the surprise of the 
evening. His set was made up of the 
most imaginative songs and demonstra- 
tive pieces that I have ever seen at 
a concert. The only person capable of 
being as good as he is in lyrical wit, 
is Randy Newman. His stage act puts 
him far ahead of the usual solo act. 
The highlight of his act was a French 
song called "Odverous". For it. he put 
on a beret, fake moustache, beard and 
a real French red and white checkered 
tablecloth and bib. His act was enjoyed 
so much that he came out for three 
encores. 

The next group to come out was called 
"Howdy Moon". They were an acoustic 
folk type group made up of two men 
and a woman. They displayed some of 
the most beautiful harmonies this side 
of Peter, Paul and Mary. They were 
very good vocally and instrumentally, 
but they lacked in their use of material. 
The reason they didn't come across as 
well was their nervousness on stage. 
This is understandable considering that 



this was their first nationwide tour and 
that they are used to playing in small 
coffeehouses. 

Finally John Sebastian and band walked 
on stage. The first number was a blues 
featuring John on harmonica. It was clear 
from the beginning that this was his 
show. They then proceeded to do songs 
from the John Sebastian and "Lovin' 
Spoonful" albums. The highlight of the 
evening was when John played his auto- 
harp. It was almost like seeing the 
'Lovin' Spoonful" again. From the 
beginning of "You Didn't Have to Be 
So Nice", the crowd was on its feet. 
It turned into a fever pitch as John 
went into "Do You Believe in Magic". 
After doing a number of encores with 
the band and finally a solo, the Cycle 
was lucky enough to get an interview 
with John. Here's what he had to say: 
CYCLE: I understand that Crosby, Still 
and Nash was originally supposed to be 
called Crosby, Still, and Sebastian. What 
can you tell us about this? 
John: That was called the Reliability 
Bros. Everyone that was in that group 
had been kicked out of another group. 
continued on page six 



The Boston Globe 
Thursday, October 26, 1972 
By Margo Miller of the 
Globe Staff 

US District Court Judge Frank J. 
Murray took under advisement yesterday 
a Federal request for authority to seize 
the incoming mail of four Boston 
companies which prepare and sell term 
papers to college students. 

Murray took the step after counsel 
for the defendants answered government 
testimony by saying their clients pre- 
pared the papers for research purposes 
only and not for submission as a stu- 
dent's original work. 

Named in the complaint, which changes 
use of the mails to defraud, were In- 
ternational Termpapers, Champion 
Termpapers, Termpapers Unlimited, 
and the Academic Research Group. 

A similar action, citing 10 companies 
as defendants, begins today in Suffork 
Superior Court. That case, brought by 
Boston University with at least seven 
institutions sharing the legal fees, seeks 
to ban the sale of termpapers. 

"It is quite obvious, "Murray said 
after lawyers for the defendants had 
argued "that there is no challenge to 
the facts." The companies, he summed 
up, had produced the (term)papers and 
mailed them out to purchasers-US Postal 
Inspectors -for a fee, paid by check or 
money order. 

Each company, however, denied know- 
ledge of the purchasers final use of 
the material. 

Attached to the suit, brought by the 
US and the US Postal Service, are 
affidavits by four postal inspectors 
describing the term papers they bought 
last summer. 



THE SGA PHONE IS LOCKED 
FOR A REASON 



A recent article in one of the Boston 
daily papers stating that, "The search 
continues at Salem State College to find 
out why the telephone bill there totaled 
$2,000 during the past year", prompted 
an inquiry into procedures regarding 
Fitchburg State College's SGA telephone 
use. There is a lock on the phone in 
the SGA office, something new this year. 

vVhen asked if the lock on the Student 
Government Association's phone was due 
to circumstances similar to those at 
Salem. Alice Seagull, President of the 
SGA, explained that the phone in the 
SGA office is billed separately from the 
phones of the administration and business 
offices. 

"The SGA's phone bill last year was 
over $2,000, while the budget allowed 
for $1,825. "Miss Seagull stated. The 



SGA President went on to explain that 
out of this figure ($1825.) must come ail 
office supplies AS WELL AS the phono 
bill. 

Several incidents of students abusing 
telephone privileges last year (making 
and accepting out-of-state calls of a 
non-business nature) necessitated the 
lock on the phone. Miss Seagull ex- 
plained, "As a preventative measure." 

Quick to be pointed out was the clari- 
fication that any authorized groups or 
individuals desiring to make calls of a 
business nature may obtain the key to 
the SGA phone from Alice Seagull, Rick 
Paula, and, at a future time, from the 
new SGA office secretary. All calls must 
be logged for individual billing of clubs 
and organizations. 



Arguing for Academic Research 
Group, Barry Levine told Murray that 
Students who come to his office are 
required to sign an affidavit saying they 
won't submit the actual paper to a pro- 
fessor. 

Levine suggested that the affidavit 
was in the nature of consumer protection, 
by preventing the use of the material 
by another student. 

Levine also pointed that each page 
issued by Academic Research Group is 
stamped "for research purposes only." 

Postal Inspector James M. Tierney's 
affidavit on the Academic Research 
Group states that on July 25 he sent 
an $1 money, order and two days later 
received a nine-page paper entitled, 
"James Baldwin-His Writings." The 
termpaper, atached as an exhibit, 
contains six footnotes and an 11-term 
bibliography on the final page. 

With this, Tierney also received a 
letter signed by Academic Research 
Group's Alan J. Kitty, stating that failure 
by Tierney to provide the name of his 
school "may result in a duplication 
to the school or professor of the material 
which you now have. Please call us and 
correct our files." 

FITCHBURG STATE COLLEGE- 

The above reprinted article by Margo 
Miller of the Boston Glove reincarnates 
the conflicting, unresolved issues 
brought on the college scene by the no- 
so-new, mail-order termpaper compa- 
nies. This time around, however, 
morality may not be the issue to be 
defended. 

Several years ago when termpapers - 
for-cash were first appearing on the 
student market, the moral issue was 
left to be decided by individual students 
and their professors. "It's just not 
honest to submit work as original that 
is not your own." 

The courts today may be deciding, 
not the morality, but the legality of 
mail-order termpapers by attacking the 
companies providing such services 
through charges of fraud. 

Yet to be proven is the contention 
that the termpapers companies do, in 
fact, realize that the termpapers they 
peddle on campuses in Massachusett 
will not be used solely for "research 
purposes only." 

The question of morality was recently 
brought up in a Worcester, Massa- 
chusetts newspaper interview of several 
central Massachusetts State College 
newspaper editors. Questions were asked 
regarding policy making on each campus 
as concerns paid ads from the termpaper 
companies wishing to advertise in school 
papers. Is this a moral question'.' 

continued on page two 



PAGE 2 



CYCLE 



DECEMBER 1, 1972 



GAittoiAt 



Will the real thief please stand out? Some disease has hit the FSC 
campus and unless something is done, somebody is going to have to 
pay for this pocketing of other people. To date, I know of two type- 
writers, a wall clock, a stereo and tape player, and a small amount 
of cash besides. Someone has been doing pretty well, don't you think! 

No one would ever steal from a chapel. Yet, it was done! The tape- 
player and stereo originated from there along with some various 
religious albums taken with much trouble by damaging the establish- 
ment by way of ripped wallpaper and a broken window. Any more breaks 
and the Newman Center will look like the Behavioral Science Building! 

The typewriters belonged to the Cycle and Commuters' Board. The 
clock; from the study lounge. We, the students, will end up paying for 
this through our student fees or whatever. 

If the thieves are outthere, do something worthwhile, rip-off the campas 
cops television! Maybe then they'll start to look for the ripped-off 
stereos and tape players, possibly to find them before they miss their 
Hawaii Five-O. 



Letters to the Editor 



NAME OF AUTHOR 
O MITTED 



by MICHELLE MORIN 

The Cycle printed a poem 
entitled THE END, but unfortunately om- 
mitted the name of the author. To com- 
pensate for this mistake, this reporter 
decided to write an article about the ar- 
tist. His name is Ken Riley, his age- 
24 yrs. Ken is better known by the di- 
minutive of "Kendo" (a nick name he 
received from a friend whom he convince 
to go straight from drugs; to thank him 
the friend developed the nickname 
"Kendo" meaning I "can do" it- I 
can go straight!) 

Ken has written other poems and com- 
piled them in a book called BEFORE MY 
SECOND LIFETIME. He hopes to have 
this book published soon. Not only is 
Ken a writer of verse, but he is also 
a member of a seven piece rock group 
entitled "The Colors Of Love." When 
I asked Ken exactly what he liked to do 
as hobbies, he replyed, "I like to play 
sports and I like to make music, poetry, 
and of course love!" 

The mysterious man in the white, 
sheepskin hat is a veteran of Vietnam. 
When Ken returned from 'Nam, still in 
the service, he attended the University 
of Wisconsin. (Previous to the armed 
forces he had attended Delaware State 
College on a football scholarship, and 
from there he went to the Institute Of 
Computer Technology.) Upon completion 
of his military services, he returned to 
Fitchburg to see some old' friends, for 
he had become familiar with this place 
during his post at Fort Devens. Soon 



after his arrival he decided to attend 
Fitchburg State College to complete his 
Doctorate in Psychology. 

Ken is an easy going, mellow, friendly 
person, who is extremely easy to talk 
to. In fact, this reporter had no diffi- 
culty at all in obtaining an interview! 
I sincerely hope that this article has 
given you a little insight on the person 
of the author of the poem-THE END! 

CAREER 
DEVELOPMENT 
TEST BATTERY 

"I am uncertain about my career- - 
For what kind of work am I best suited?" 

The above question is asked by many 
students who come to the Counseling 
center. 

In order to help students answer this 
question more effectively, the staff of 
the Counseling Center is offering a 
battery of career devolopment tests. 
The battery includes assessment in the 
areas of interest, personality and values 
as they are related to the world of work. 
The results of the battery, coupled with 
information from the new career library 
at the Counseling Center can aid the 
student in the decision-making process 
involved in choosing amajor or determi- 
ning a career choice. For further infor- 
mation about the battery or for making 
arrangements to take the battery, call 
343-6417, ext 296 anytime between 8:00 
AM and 4:30 PM weekdays, or drop in 
the Counseling Center, located at 295 
Highland Avenue. 

THE COUNSELING STAFF 



CYCLE STAFF 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF: David L. Johnson 

PHOTOGRAPHER John George 

MANAGING SECRETARY: Connie Strong 

BUSINESS MANAGER: Jim DiBeiia 

CAMPUS NEWS: WendyHood 

FEATURES: Dave Mooney 

SPORTS Yvonne LaGarde 

LAY-OUT COMMITTEE Dede Kneer WendyHood 

Jim DiBella 

STUDENT REPRESENTATIVE: Yvonne LaGarde 

REPORTERS: 

Mary Fenton, Sandra Martin, Maureen McCarthy, Michelle Morln, Sam Malone 



TO THE EDITOR: 

I have a psychology course with a 
female professor who started the course 
by requiring a ten dollar text book. 
This was alright, until it was noticed 
by her that the book was terribly out 
dated. She said she liked it for its 
bibliographies! Aren't the professors re- 
quired or urged to review a book before 
requiring it? 

Following a few dull lectures, she 
explained a schedule for student 
presentations as well as passing out a 
multipage bibliography list to be used 
as references to the topics. This lrist 
could have replaced the text book. Now. 
with the term coming to an end, she 
just required a seven dollar readings 
book for us to read six items contained 
within! 

I don't think that you have to look too 
far to discover who this is. She should 
be reviewed as a responsible professor 
to see if she measures up. How can 
teachers get away with this presentations 
bit. We might as well have an independent 
study class since the prof does nothing 
when she comes in, if she manages to 
make it on time. 

I've spent seventeen dollars on a 
course that has presented nothing to 
me. COME ON HARRY, DO SOMETHING 
ABOUT THIS USELESS TEACHER. THIS 
COURSE IS REQUIRED BY SOME 
MAJORS AND NEEDED BY OTHERS, 
SO WHY GO THROUGH A MEANING- 
LESS SEMESTER WITH A MEANING- 
LESS TEACHER. 

(name withheld for fear of mark 
discrimination) 

TO THE EDITOR: 

This is in response to the Herlihy 
Hall Independent's editorial in the re- 
cent issue of the Cycle. 

I am a member of a fraternity on 
campus and though I am not as gung- 
ho about fraternities as some guys are, 
I still take offense from the letter. It 
seems that "Mr. Herlihy Hall Indepen- 
dent" thinks that the frats act out of 
complete inconsideration of anyone but 
themselves. I would like to ask this 
ass-hole who he thinks sponsors the 
parties at Saima Park and the Four 
Seasons. (We also sponsor certain 
movies, sports evens and other social 
activities during the year,) I am not 
saying that these dances are terrific 
because they are far from it, but at 
least we give the students something to 
do once in awhile in this boring town. 
Do you and your friends, who feel the 
same about fraternities as you. sponsor 
any activities on campus? I doubt it, 
shit-head! 

As to your remarks about fraternities 
being cliques and their members being 
stuck-up, I will admit that in some cases 
this may be true. Just as it is also 
true that some of the dorm students 
are stuck-up dinks. 

If guys like you do not want to join 
fraternities, then that is your business. 
But until clowns like you do something 
for this school's social life, then I 
would suggest that you take your own 
guest editorial and shove it up your 
ass. 

Term Papers 

continued from page one 

Several different answers were given. 
Two editors refused to carry the ads 
after they learned of the pending court 
action. 

One newspaper editor refuted the 
question of morality saying that the 
running of the ads was "strictly 
business." "A matter of business" is 
the current policy of the CYCLE, 
remarked Editor David Johnson. 
"CYCLE has run paid ads for Term- 
Papers Unlimited as a business matter, 
not involving a voral issue. 

In an attempt to learn of up-date 
policies at other State Colleges, CYCLE 
phoned several without success. 
Worcester State College issued the 
following statement: "As long as it's 
legal and we're getting paid for it." 



TO THE EDITOR: 

I would like to congratulate you on 
your being elected as Editor of the 
Cycle. Being a student, I sometimes 
hear people complaining about the Cycle 
and its Editor. I would like to say that 
you are doing an excellent job. I also 
feel that the staff of the Cycle is pro- 
ducing a very good paper. Sometimes 
I hear people critizing Huck's Column, 
this is a very good column and adds 
a lot to the paper. I noticed in your 
last edition Helpful Hanna's column was 
missing. I hope this was only for an 
issue, because it is my favorite column. 
To the people who criticize, if you feel 
you can do something better or as good 
why don't you join the Cycle. I know 
they need the help, if you don't want 
to join then write a guest column for it. 
I hope the Cycle staff keeps up the good 
work of providing a voice for the stu- 
dents. 

ANONYMOUS 



TO THE EDITOR: 

I'd like to express my congratulations 
to the whole Cycle staff for having done 
a marvelous job of putting the paper 
together this year. These aren't my 
feelings alone, for I've spoken to many 
other students who wholeheartedly agree 
with me. I look forward to each issue 
of the Cycle and am glad that someone 
at least has enough interest to work 
hard to make the paper happen. 

To the question of why no one else 
is running for the editorship of the 
paper, I'd like to say that it clearly 
reflects the apathy of the students in 
this school. Dave is doing a great job, 
but even if he weren't, I doubt anyone 
else would bother to seek any responsibi- 
lities such as running for class or 
organization offices. This school is stag- 
nation if not dying and I want out as 
soon as I can. Maybe many others feel 
that way too and only speed up the 
stagnation. All I can say is thank you 
Dave for showing that there are at least 
a few students who show some en- 
thusiasm even at F.S.C, 

S.E 



TO THE EDITOR: 

Might I dash off a few thoughts about 
the parking problem at this institution? 

I think that everyone will agree that 
it's somewhat inconveniant having to 
part one's automobile halfway home. 

What really burns my ass is not so 
much the actions taken by the Campus 
Finest, our own police force, but rather 
by the city police ; who usually assign 
either a patrol car or a motorcycle 
full-time to tag cars. After the 12th 
fatality in Fitchburg this year, I'm 
amazed that they can still find an of- 
ficer with enough time to tag all day 
long. 

Don't get me wrong through, I realize 
that the police can have legitimate bitches 
with cars parked in front of driveways 
and hydrants and on corners, but in 
the past week, I've gotten tickets (at 
$2.00 per whack) for "not having my 
right wheels against the curb" at least 
three times. Come on, fellas. Have a 
heart, Huh? 

I'm not a proponant of vast expanses 
of blacktop (and I even work for a 
paving co.), but I do think that the old 
urban renewal plans to build parking 
lots on North and Clinton Streets had 
some merit. 

In the meantime, I try to walk to school 
as much as I can, but the few times 
that I take my car, there are assholes 
that tag it for silly things, assholes 
that box it in and assholes in trucks 
that get mud and shit all over it. 

I'd take my bike, though if some 
asshole didn't rip it off, the police 
would probably tag It! 

P.S. If it sounds like I used too many 
"assholes", that's because this campus 
has too many. 

DG. 



DECEMBER 1, 1972 



CYCLE 



PAGE 3 



OUR CITY'S SLUDGE 



by KENNETH G. MOISON 



An interview withNorman Cote, Super- 
visor of General Accounting, Fitchburg 
Paper Co. 

QUESTION: Is Fitchburg Co. doing 
it's share to clean up the Nashua River? 
ANSWER: As early as the middle 50' s. 
Fitchburg Paper started a program to 
eliminate chemicals from certain paper 
processes for ecology reasons. In the 
early 60*s, the firm of Malcom-Perimi 
engineering was hired by us to design 
a waste-treatment plant. It was at this 
time that the state and city got involved. 
By August of '68, Camp .Dresser and 
McKee had submitted a comprehensive 
plan for domestic and industrial waste 
water disposal, this is the West Fitch- 
burg plant. The engineering plans were 
drawn up and by the fall of '71, the bids 
were out. These bids were returned just 
two weeks ago. Now the city has two 
months to select the bidder and file the 
appropriate form with the state and 
federal government to be eligible to 
receive the necessary subsidies. 
QUESTION: It sounds like the city is 
getting a big'bill for years of polluting 
by private industry. 

ANSWER: Not really. The cost is being 
born proportionately by the city, 
Weyerhauser, and us. Only since the 
report of Camp Dresser and McKee 
has the city been sharing the cost. The 
city stands to benefit from the plant 
by providing sewerage treatment for the 
homes in the Brick Mill section. 
QUESTION: The city's portion of the 
original estimate of 5.5 million dollars 
in now up substantially, with the bids 
now in around 17 million. 
ANSWER: The expenditures we will 
have to make initially will cost almost 
1.25 million. The total 17 million dol- 
lars breaks down like this. Under a 
1972 new plant grant system the state 
will provide 25%, the Federal Govern- 
ment another 55%. This is a total of 
80% of the total cost. The remaining 
20% will be divided as follows: 48% 
Weyerhauser, 38% Fitchburg Paper and 
14% the city. This means the city will 
have an original outlay of just over 
$390,000 to provide all the homes in 



that section of the city with sewerage 

treatment. They will not add to their 

other already over taxed sewerage 

treatment plant. 

QUESTION: What about the new plant 

operation expenditures? 

ANSWER: The estimates are now at 

$430,000 per year for operation and 

this will be divided the same way, 

48, 28. and 14. These estimates are 



The secondary is a series of filters 
to purify the remaining water which 
will go back into the river. 
QUESTION: What happens to the chemi- 
cals and sludge. 

ANSWER? There is a sediment hole near 
the plant where the sludge and chemi- 
cals will be pumpad. This hole should 
be large enough to contain all the waste 
we should get in the next fifteen years. 



of almost $150,000 a year, how will 
Fitchburg Paper continue to do business? 
ANSWER: Pollution control at our plant 
will reduce our profits by $400,000 a 
year and we will have to cut corners 
and economize. We hope that we will 
receive additional business from those 
paper companies who cannot afford pol- 
lution controls. 
QUESTION: Economize how? 




"GRANDPA?" 



ALTERNATIVE FEATURES SERVICE 



based upon maximum production but as 
you know the paper mills are never 
always at maximum production. 
QUESTION: How will the plant itself 
operate? 

AXSAER: It uses a primary and 
secondary treatment system. The 
primary will be used to remove chemi- 
cals and sludge from the waste water. 



A THANK YOU TO Are You A Special 



THE FRESHMAN 
COMMUTERS 



I would like to state publically that I 
am grateful to all those people who voted 
for me in the past election. Although 
I did not win, I still intend co work very 
hard for the commuters. I am sorrythat 
I let you down and did not achieve the 
position, but I guess that there just 
weren't enough of you out there voting. 
Thank you again. If there is anything 
that I can help you with, just the same, 
you may contact me in the lounge or 
through one of the officers of the board. 
Thanks again, 

MICHELLE MORfN 



Special Notice 

Attention Senior Class 

The 1973 commencement exercise may 
seem in the distant future, however the 
constantly growing number of graduates 
requires that we mate reservations and 
delivery schedules well in advance to 
guarantee delivery of cap, gown, and 
hood rentals. 

These schedules depend entirely on 
early receipt of reservations. 

Will the senior class officers please 
contact the college bookstore imme- 
diately so that these reservations can 
be made. 



Education Major? 



Are you on top of what is going on 
in the Special Education Department? 

Are you involved in the activities of 
the Special Education Department? 

If these questions apply to you and 
you have answered no, I am not know- 
ledgeable of things going on. No, I 
am not involved with the activities in 
the Special Education Department. Then, 
please be kind enough to answer my next 
inquiry. 

Whose fault is it, that you haven't 
any idea of what is going on? 

Whose fault is it, that you are not 
involved in Special Education activities? 

Don't even try to pass-off the blame 
to someone else. Don't even try and 
place the blame on yourself. 

Rather: ACT NOW, GET INVOLVED. 

In order to do this, you have to know 
how to go about it. 

Well, you have alternatives: 

1) Wander up to the Special Edu- 
cation Office on the third floor of Edger- 
ly and talk to your Special Education 
Advisor. If you don't even know who your 
advisor is, then ask someone while in the 
office, who are the Freshman, Sopho- 
more, or Junior advisors. Talk to the 
appropriate advisor and at least you are 
on your way. 

2) Read the Special Education In- 
formation Bulletin Board outside the 
office of the Special Education Depart- 
ment. This bulletin board tells you 
about the current activities going on in 
the Department. 

3) Talk to an active and concerned 
student in Special Education. Seek 
both students and professionals. 

Most of all, realize that your easiest 
alternative is - APATHY. Your apathy 
is something you and Special Education 
don't need, rather your concern and your 
involvement is a necessity. 



QUESTION: The new Fitchburg dump is 
having trouble with polluted water 
seeping through the water-shed and this 
is only from rain on the dry waste. 
What about a semi-liquid of sludge and 
chemicals? 

ANSWER: It is far enough from the water 
table and river that the engineers say 
it should not be a problem. 
QUESTION: From a start in the 50' s 
to clean up the paper process to a 
still dirty river in the 70' s is considered 
slow progress? 

ANSWER: We were ready in 1962 to 
tie into a water -treatment station. That 
year we spent $75,000 to consolidate 
our dumping pipes from eight pipes to 
one for future hook-up into lines going 
to a water-treatment plant. Plant costs 
and bureaucracy tend to slow down 
the gears of progress. 

QUESTION: Was that ecology or econo- 
my? 

ANSWER-. I wan't here at the time but 
I would imagine both. 
QUESTION: Besides the gesture in the 
50' s and 60' s and cost sharing, what 
are you doing? 

ANSWER: Fithcburg Paper has just hired 
the firm of Camp, Dresser and McKee 
to design pumping stations and lay lines 
to the new treatment plant. We spend 
as much as $6,000 anually just to belong 
to associations such as the National 
Council for Air and Stream Improve- 
ment, The Nashua River Reservoir 
Association, The Nashua River Water 
Shed Association. For some time we 
have purchased the chemicals, used in 
paper making, free of pollutants such as 
mercury and cadmium. This all adds 
up to a serious commitment to cleaning 
up the river. 

QUESTION: Now we don't have to worry 
about eating the fish we catch from the 
river, they are free of mercury. 
ANSWER: That is not fair. 
QUESTION: What good does it do to 
spend $6,000 annually on associations? 
ANSWER: They provide us with 
information on pollution control laws 
and ways to fund pollution control pro- 
jects. 

QUESTION: Once the treatment plant is 
in operation, how long will it take for 
the river to clean itself? 
ANSWER: This is difficult to say. It 
may be necessary for the army corp 
of engineers to help. To speed up what 
mother nature would take years to do. 
QUESTION: With an investment of over 
1.25 million and added operation costs 



ANSWER: We hope to consolidate mills 

one and two into mill four and operate 

a more advantageous swing-shift similar 

to that of Weyerhauser. 

QUESTION: How many lost jobs? 

ANSWER: About 30. There will be some 

attrition between now and the time this 

comes about. 

QUESTION: Another boost to the city 

of Fitchburg? 

ANSWER: We have provided many jobs 

and helped to make the city prosper 

through the years. 

QUESTION: How many people work in 

your section and how many live in 

Fitchburg? 

ANSWER:. About 56 and there are 13 

or so who reside in town. 

QUESTION: Not bad, 23% of the 

employees in your section contribute to 

the support of the city. As a Fitchburg 

resident all your life, how does Norman 

Cote presently feel about the river.? 

ANSWER: It is too bad but it never 

really bothered me even before I was 

an employee at Fitchburg Paper. 



Long Time 
Passing . . . 

Daring the past weeks the loss of 
magazines from the library Periodical 
Department has sharply increased. In 
order to reduce these losses it has 
been necessary to establish new proce- 
dures for using magazines. The present 
system is as follows: 

1. Fill out a Magazine Request 
Slip with title and date of magazines 
and your name. 

2. Leave all slips at the desk 
together with either an ID card or a 
drivers license. 

3. Obtain magazines from the 
stacks. 

4. Return all magazines to the desk 
and claim ID card. 

This policy was inaugurated in res- 
ponse to student complaints that many 
needed magazines were missing from the 
shelves. It is the feeling of the library 
that if everyone will follow these new 
procedures a serious problem can be 
considerably alleviated. 

W. T. Casey, 
Head Librarian 



PAGE 4 



CYCLE 



DECEMBER 1, 1972 



Interview 



Steve Medeiros 



IY LINDA CLARK 



Mr. Medeiros is a 1972 graduate from 
Bridgewater State College. While at 
school he majored in English. During 
the following interview, Mr. Medeiros 
explains some of the problems that he 
was confronted with while student 
teaching. 

INTERVIEWER: FOR BACKGROUND 
PURPOSES, WHEN AND WHERE DID 
YOU DO YOUR STUDENT TEACHING? 
MR. MEDEIROS: November 71 to 
February 72, about nine to ten weeks, 
Morton Junior High, Fall River, Mass. 
INTERVIEWER: ONE OF THE MAIN 
ISSUES AT MORTON JUNIOR HIGH IS 
THE PROBLEM OF DISCIPLINE. IN 
YOUR OPINION, WHAT SPECIFICALLY 
SEEMED TO BE THE SOURCE OF STU- 
DENT TROUBLE-MAKING? 
MR. MEDEIROS: The worst discipline 
problems in the whole school came with 
these three or four children who were 
former students at Morton Junior High. 
They had earlier caused a lot of trouble 
and had been sent off to this mental 
rehabilitation center in another part of 
the city. They would stay there three 
or four yeats, and then they wouldn't 
want them any longer at that place 
because of their age. So.. ..they would 
be sent back to school again at Morton, 
starting the same place they had left 
off. So.. ..we had two six-foot-one, 
seventeen-year-old delinquents in with 
a bunch of thirteen year old kids. Of 
course they would bully the other kids, 
throw their weight around in class and 
you had a few problems with them. They 
were like little babies. They wouldn't 
know their own strength and they'd 
really hurt a lot of other children. 
The day I left we had quite an explosion 
of events. Two days before, there was 
a little scuffle in the halls in which two 
kids jumpad on a teacher and started 
hitting him. Another teacher came over 
and hit the kids, so there was a big 
to-do about that. The day I left, there 
was that same child whom the principal 
had finally had enough of and decided 
to throw him out of school for good. 
Formerly, he had problems with him and 
would just keep him in school for half 
a day. In the afternoon he was unruly; 
in the morning he was kind of docile. 
At twelve o'clock he would go home. 
However he started getting really out 
of hand so the teachers threw him out. 
Well, he came back the next day and 
was pounding the lockers and tipped one 
over. He leaped over the desk and 
threatened to kill the principal. This 
very same day, another child pulled a 
knife on a teacher when the teacher 
tried to escort him out of class. The 
kid turned around and knifed the teacher 
in the arm. Two other teachers had 
to physically drag the kid out of school. 
He was sent off to jail. That same day, 
another kid had a chain taken away from 
him. What in the world he was going 
to do with a chain no one knows. But 
it was the kind you could hit someone 
with; a motorcycle chain, I believe. 
A lot of the teachers came to think 
that all the trouble came from the fact 
that you had these mentally unstable 
people in with normal kids -in there 
disrupting everything. You just can't in- 
volve normal kids, or kids who are just 
a little unruly but can be handled, with 
these other kids who just don't care 
about anything. It disrupts the whole 
system. The kids absolutely ought to 
have been isolated and sent to a special 
school with special counselors -people 
with training-not just regular teachers 
with no kind of training with mentally 
disturbed children. We would have had 
a lot less problems if they had. 
INTERVIEWED: DID THE OTHER STU- 
DENTS LOOK UP TO THESE DELIN- 
QUENTS AS LEADERS BECAUSE OF 
THEIR AGE. BUILD, ETC.,? 
MR. MEDEIROS: Yes. that was the 
whole problem. Kids who were a little 
wild but could be handled easily by the 
teacher if given a menancing look, would 



look up to these big troublemakers as 
leaders, drawing courage from them to 
act up. They never would do this without 
such a person. As a matter of fact, 
when these leaders were expelled or 
sent home after half a day, the other 
borderline cases were quite well 
behaved. 

INTERVIEWER WHAT OTHER UN- 
USUAL PROGRAM IS PART OF THE 
MORTON JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 
SYSTEM? 

MR. MEDEIROS: Fall River has a 
very, very high drop-out rate. Because 
of its poverty the kids have to drop 
out and go to work to help support the 
family. So a federally -financed program 
was started to give dropouts a chance 
to go back to school. The incentive 
was that they would trainthem in anything 
they wanted, like auto repair, so long 
as they took a few academics. They 
isolated these kids by building a special 
trailer. The kids would have all of their 
classes in the trailer-they'd never come 
to the other part. If they did (normally 
they were a lot older-about seventeen or 
eighteen and many had police records), 
they would come to start trouble, so, 
they had to isolate them. The only bad 
thing was-there was too much giving in 
to these kids -of giving them what they 
wanted. They thought they ruled the 
place and would walk around like they 
were the owners. They would demand 
that we want rock music at our lunches 
and we want this and we want that- 
and it all got out of hand. Some of the 
demands became really unbelievable. 
They just wanted to assert themselves 
and to show that they had some kind 
of control over the teachers. 

However, in a lot of cases this worked 
fine. Some of the kids came back, 
worked hard, accomplished a lot and 
these kids picked up their diplomas. 
But once you start giving in to them- 
some of these spoiled brats just start 
making bigger and bigger demands and 
if you keep giving in to them -then 
forget it! You'll have a complete mess- 
a zoo! 

INTERVIEWER: U HATSPECIFICALLY 
DID YOU FIND WAS YOUR MAIN PRO- 
BLEM IN ADMINISTERING DISCI- 
PLINE? 

MR MEDEIROS: I think the most im- 
portant problem of discipline is the fact 
that if you don't have the principal 
behind you-if you have a marshmallow 
principal who's afraid of the parents 
and afraid of public opinion-then you're 
in trouble. Because the teachers have got 
to have sort of a free hand, especially 
in a school system where there are a 
lot of wild kids. You have alotof spoiled 
kids on one hand and a lot of delin- 
quents from poor families and well, 
hoodlums with criminal records on the 
other hand. If you have all that, then 
you've got to have a strong hand for 
what goes on in class. 
INTERVIEWER: WERE THERE ANY 
OTHER MAJOR OBSTACLES FOR A 
TEACHER TO OVERCOME IN TRYING 
TO PUNISH A CHILD? 
MR. MEDEIROS: Well, we had kind of 
a strange school system because we 
imported kids from all over the city 
practically. We had a lot of buses going 
great distances, so we had a busing 
rule. If you wanted to keep a kid after 
school, you had to give him twenty- 
four hour notice. This is absolutely 
foolish, for if a kid knew that he was 
going on a bus at twenty-four hour 
notice, he could act up all he wanted 
and possibly the teacher would forget 
about it the next day. So that was dumb. 
When a kid acts up you strike him down 
there -you don' t wait twenty-four hours or 
thirty-six hours or whatever. You just 
put him right there. So.. ..if a kid acted 
up and you went and saw the principal, 
he'd say, 'T'm sorry, I can't do any- 
thing about it, we have this busing rule." 
And that would throw your whole dis- 
cipline strategy out of the window. 

Then, on the other hand, you also had 
a lot of very rich, influential people. 
If their child happened to act up. Mommy 
and Daddy would be waiting outdoors 
in the car: and if you kept the kid 
after, they would come over and not see 
you. but would instead see the principal. 
Then the principal would come over and 
ask what the story was and you'd catch 
heck. You'd have to sit there for twenty 



minutes explaining what the problem was 
plus write out a full explanation. The 
principal, in turn, would make you look 
like the villain so that he could keep 
peace with the student' s parents. 
INTERVIEWER: GENERALLY SPEAK- 
ING, TEEN -AGERS TODAY SEEM TO BE 
VERY CONCERNEDWITHTOPICSSUCH 
AS ECOLOGY, POLITICS, VIETNAM, 
AND SO ON. DID YOU FIND THIS TRUE 
OF YOUR CLASSES OR WERE THEY 
INTERESTED IN OTHER ISSUES? 
MR. MEDEIROS: The classes I had were 
mostly interested in the drug problem, 
police and things like that. They weren't 
very much interested in national topics 
because they were wrapped up in their 
own little world; which on one hand was 
the very rich and not more than three 
blocks away-the very poor, in the slum. 
So you had quite a diversity. The poor 
kids were right on the verge of dropping 
out. I lost six or seven alone in three 
months. Also, because they know that 
they're only going to be in for another 
three or four more weeks, they would 
act up, have a good time, stay out 
of school a lot and not really care. 
Just their very presence in the class- 
room was enough to hold down the intelli- 
gent kids who were a little better off. 
This group would tend to hold back and 
not want to appear conspicuous in class 
as if they knew something, or were trying. 
So they just held themselves back. It 
would show in their compositions and in 
their tests that they were pretty in- 
telligent, but when it came to classroom 
participation, there was absolutely 
nothing. 

INTERVIEWER: DID YOU HAVE MANY 
DISCIPLINE PROBLEMS? IF SO, HOW 
DID YOU REACT TO THEM? 
MR. MEDEIROS: Well, for the most part, 
most of the kids that everyone else had 
trouble with, I didn't have problems with 
at all. I just treated them normally 
and if I had to keep them a'ter school 
I explained why I had to keep them 
after-that it really wasn't fair to the 
other kids that wanted to do things. The 
main thing is to impress upon them 
that you're running the class equally 
and that there are absolutely no favorites. 
That's the most important thing. Because 
these kids feel inferior to start with. 
The other kids have all the advantages; 
they don't have to work after school, 
they have nicer clothes, they have dic- 
tionaries and parents at home who will 
help them out with their compositions 
and whatnot. On the other hand, the poor 
kids come home to an empty house, 
they have no books at all, they usually 
have to babysit for their little brothers 
and they can't go to the library and do 
extra work. These kids don't want to 
try in class for they feel it's useless 
competing with the others. So you have 
to give them the feeling that they're 
pretty well equal. You must give them 
equal treatment for everything equal 
reward and equal punishment. 
INTERVIEWER: THAT'S TRUE BUT 
DIDN'T YOU HAVE TO GIVE SOME 
SORT OF SPECIAL TREATMENT TO 
THE PROBLEM CHILD, IN ORDER TO 
RID HIM OF HIS BAD HABITS, AND TO 
START HTM WORKING? 



MR. MEDEIROS: One of the things- 
when you have an intelligent, pretty bright 
kid, he'll usually answer in class and 
get rewarded. But the dumb kid, who 
hasn't done his homework, will feel 
kind of left out. So you try to involve 
him in the class. You let him pass out 
papers and do things like that. That way 
he feels like he's part of the class 
too. And, then he will want to get in- 
volved more. He'll even start reading 
and giving his opinions. 
INTERVIEWER: DID THIS REALLY 
WORK OR WAS IT JUST A NICE 
THEORY? 

MR. MEDEIROS: This isn't just a nice 
theory. I found out, slowly but surely, 
the more responsibility you give a kid 
the more responsible .he'll become in 
his school work. If you just ignore him 
and isolate him in a corner so he won't 
talk to anyone-he' 11 withdraw into his 
own shell and you'll never get him to 
do any work. You'll get him quiet but 
that's no good. It's better to have a 
noisy, busy class that's participating, 
then to have a quiet class that's com- 
pletely held under the thumb-who'll just 
explode at once. 

INTERVIEWER: ONE THING THAT YOU 
DID WAS TO INSTITUTE THE JOURNAL. 
THIS IS A DIARY TO BEKEPTBYEACH 
STUDENT EVERY DAY AND PASSED IN 
AT THE END OF THE WEEK. WHY 
DID YOU PUT SUCH A METHOD INTO 
THE CURRICULUM OF YOUR ENGLISH 
CLASSES? 

MR MEDEIROS: When I started the 
Journal, it was just an idea of mine 
to get them to write a little each day. 
I figured the more writing they would 
do, the more they would get into the 
habit of writing and of putting their own 
thoughts into words on paper. It's like 
exercise; if you do a little bit a day, 
then it will be valuable to you. If you 
do a little bit one week and a little 
bit in about three weeks, then how is 
your writing ever going to improve? 
You have to keep at it every day. When 
I started it, I really wasn't interested 
in their own personal problems I jast 
wanted to get them used to putting their 
own private little thoughts into words, 
and communicating it to other people on 
paper. When they wrote the Journal, 
they, would use their own subject ma'ter, 
their own ideas on certain things-their 
own genuine idsas, in their own words, 
saying it the way they likes to say it. 
That would help them develop their own 
personal style and that is what an English 
teacher is after. Getting a kid to say 
what he wants to say in his own words, 
in a way that people understand him. 
INTERVIEWER: DID THIS METHOD 
BRING ABOUT RESULTS? 
MR. MEDEIROS: In the beginning, of 
course, at the end of the week they would 
just write a whole bunch of things. You 
could tell and you let them know in 
the Journal when you corrected it, that 
you knew that this is what they were 
doing. A lot of kids would just write 
down a few sentences, taking advantage 
of the fact that you said "Write any- 
thing". But then, towards the end, I 
talked to them, and said, 'Well what 
happened... how did this affect you.. ..what 
continued on page five 



John Sdoucos 

& Lennie Sogoloff 

PRESENT: 

Judy Collins 

Sat. December 2, 1972 At 8:30 P.M. 

WORCESTER AUDITORIUM WORCESTER, MASS. 
TICKET PRICES: $3.50 $4.50 $5.50 
TICKET OUTLETS: STEINERTS, SUNFLOWER 

And 
Sun. December 3, 1972 At 7:30 P.M. 

LOWELL TECH GYM LOWELL, MASS. 
TICKET PRICES: $4.00 ADVANCE $5.00 DOOR 

TICKET OUTLETS: ZEPPELIN, UNISEX,LOWELL TECH, 



DECEMBER 1, 1972 



CYCLE 



PAGE 5 



continued from page four 
do you think about Christmas...why is it 
good, why is it bad, even why do you 
hate your mother?" And, slowly but 
surely, their writing would become much 
more readable and it would have much 
more logic and thought behind it instead 
of just spurting out a bunch of emotions 
on paper. They think things out a lot 
more because they knew I'd pin them 
down some day and say, "Why, why, 
why, why all this emotion, why do you 
think this way?" They'd write it down, 
all the reasons why and everything would 
be much more logical; their compositions 
would be much better too. 
INTERVIEWER: OF ALL YOUR EX- 
PERIENCES AT MORTON, WHICHGAVE 
YOU THE MOST DISAPPOINTMENT, AS 
A PERSON AND AS A TEACHER? 
MR. MEDEIROS: Some of the biggest 
disappointments in student teaching were 
feeling that you were accomplishing 
something-f inally getting a kid motivated 
after all the stories you've heard from 
other teachers. All these stories about 
how bad the kid was. how negligible 
his participation was and how he always 
disrupted the class. You finally get him 
doing something, but all the time you 
know he's going to drop out in about 
three weeks. It's very, very frustrating. 
Also, you know there's absolutely nothing 
you can do about it because his parents 
want him to drop out and go to work. 
That is the most, absolutely the most, 
disappointing thing in student teaching. 
INTERVIEWER: GENERALLY, A CITY 
SCHOOL HAS A LARGE NUMBER OF 
DIFFERENT ETHNIC GROUPS AND 
SOCIAL CLASSES MAKING UP ITS STU- 
DENT BODY. IF THIS WAS TRUE AT 
MORTON COULD YOU PLEASE ELA- * 
BORATE ON IT, PERHAPS GOING INTO 
THE MAIN PROBLEMS INHERENT IN 
SUCH A MIXTURE. 

MR MEDEIROS: Well, we had quite a 
mixture. We had a very lot of imm;- 
grants in that area, mostly Portuguese 
and Spanish. Our biggest problem was 
the language. You'd say, "Do you under- 
stand this?" and rather than look foolish 
in frotit of their peers, they'd say, 
"Yes, I understand it" while they were 
really having difficulties. The main thing 
is you have got to get them to come 
after school and then explain it to them 
a little better, when their friends are 
not arounu. But, I found that these are 
the kids that try the hardest-they're 
always on the ball, they're always doing 
their homework. The best work in the 
entire class was done by the kids that 
had the most difficulties. For they're 
out, more or less, to prove to themselves 
that they can do it. They had a burden, 
something spurring them on. You know. .. 
an obstacle to overcome, and they really 
worked the hardest. The kids that had 
the advantages a lot of times were very 
lazy, and they wouldn't do anything. 
Also the poor kids.... the problem was.... 
like, I had one family, who had two 
twins in my English class and two 
daughters in the grade before. There 
were four of them in that school system. 
One of them would stay out of school 
one day, the other would stay out the 
following day. Mostly because- what I 
heard from other teachers, very 
seriously-was that they were very poor 
and they didn't ha^e enough clothes. One 
would have to stay home each day be- 
cause she just wasn't clothed to go to 
school They would also have little 
children at home and would have to take 
care of them. These were mostly wel- 
fare people with just the mother working 
and five or six very small kids at 
home. These were the kids that were 
just in for two or three weeks to go 
before they dropped out of school and 
they had to drop out of school. 
INTERVIEWER: HOW DID THE OTHER 
TEACHERS REACT UNDER THESE 
PRESSURES? 

MR. MEDEIROS: Most of the teachers 
in my school system bad a lot of ex- 
perience with these children and these 
discipline problems. They would more or 
less become hardened to it and become 
belligerent-always ready to smack a kid 
down. The new teachers that came in. 
tried to deal with the kids, sitting down 
and talking to them-but after they had 
been there a while, they realized that 
it was hopeless because of the fact that 
the kids don't want to do anything if 
they're going to drop out. So these 
teachers also become hardened and would 
do anything to keep that kid quiet. A 
lot of times the men resorted to physi- 
cal violence and the women would just 
throw tantrums, throwing the kid out of 



class every other day. The principal 
would let them sit in the office and 
simmer down and that would be it. He 
really wouldn't do much because if he 
did, the kid wouldn't show up for a 
couple of days. And the parents didn't 
care if the kid skipped school or not. 
INTERVIEWER: DID YOU YOURSELF 
BECOME HARDENED? 
MR. MEDEIROS: I did a little bit 
toward the end, but I figure I had a 
lot of success with these kids. If you 
just had four or five that were really 
bad and you had a lot of reports about 
them before you started and you get in 
and you feel you've made friends with 
them and you' ve got them reading-there' s 
no better feeling in the world. At the 
end-I didn't want to leave-I would have 
liked to stay a little longer. Once you 
get there you have to first build up 
a rapport with the kids. Once you've 
got this then you feel much better and 
you can really get down to business. 
But the hardest part is breaking the 
ice. He figures you're like most other 
teachers and you're just going to slap 
him down. 

INTERVIEWER: IS THE BUILDING OF 
THIS RAPPORT WITH YOUR STUDENTS 
THE MAIN PROBLEM YOU HAVE TO 
FACE IN STUDENT TEACHING? 
MR. MEDEIROS: The main problem with 
student teaching isn't building up the 
rapport with the kids. The main part 
is really coming to grips with your 
feelings; coming to realize what your 
feelings are on discipline and other 
problems. Once you realize what your 
own theories are -and you probably don't 
realize them until you actually get out 
there and confront the kids -then you take 
it from there and work out your own 
strategy to keep the kids in control 
and to get them working. I think just 
that is the main problem. Jast coming 
to grips with yourself. 
INTERVIEWER: DO YOU THINK THAT 
STUDENT TEACING IS HARMFUL TO 
STUDENTS? DOES IT WASTE VALU- 
ABLE TIME THAT COULD BE USED 
FOR LEARNING? 

MR. MEDEIROS: I think it's very bad 
if one class is subjected to a lot of 
teachers because it takes a certain 
amount of time between meeting the class 
and getting them to work. The kids 
more or less have to feel you out and 
you have to feel the kids out. Once they 
find out how far they can go then they 
won't pressure you any longer and you 
finally get down to work. That may take 
two or three weeks. If they see a stu- 
dent teacher they will say, "Well, this 
isn't going to be a normal teacher, he's 
just going to be staying for a while, 
we can have a lot of fun with him and 
we'll finally get rid of the old teacher." 
Your main problem as a student teacher 
is getting them to realize you're going 
to be very responsible for the marks 
they get and that you are, in fact, really 
a regular teacher. Everything you give 
them in class is a part of the curricu- 
lum that has been planned for them all 
year. Once they realize you're norma' 
teacher and not just a kid like them, 
who is there to get a taste of experience, 
then you can get somewhere, 
INTERVIEWER: FINALLY, HOW MUCH 
OF A LEARNING EXPERIENCE WAS 
STUDENT TEACHING FOR YOU? WAS 
IT A WASTE OF TIME OR A WORTH- 
WHILE COURSE? 

MR. MEDEIROS: Practice teaching is the 
most valuable education course I've 
ever had. You can get a lot of theories 
and ideas from classrooms and text- 
books, and you can say, "This is the 
way to do it, this is the proper way. 
You've got to involve the kid." But 
you have got to get out there and first 
meet the kid and see who he is, what 
he likes and how you can go about 
using those great psychology courses to 
get him to study. You're not going to 
learn this by sitting in the classroom 
and just talking about it. You're going 
to learn it by getting out there and 
talking to the kids and having these 
little problems and going to bed and 
thinking of them and of what you're going 
to do the next day. That's the only way 
you're going to deal with, not only 
discipline problems, but also making out 
your own curriculum and seeing the way 
to get the kids going. Student teaching 
is the only way you're going to do it. 



J**************** 



Interview- 

Miss Tater 



by Johi George 




(This interview took place on 
November 14, 1972) 

CYCLE: Can you tell us about some of 
the changes that you've seen at F.S.C, 
Miss Tater: I first came to the col- 
lege as a student. At that time there 
was a great deal of human encounter. 
There was an intimacy of knowing all 
of the teachers and all of the students. 
For me. having been here so long, I 
miss not knowing all of the students, 
and all of the faculty, which I used to 
know. When looking back through the 
years, the biggest error I can see is 
one of omission. That is, having to omit 
so much today, due to lack of time. 
Students usually come back for help and 
I feel I should set up more time for 
conferences. Because of the larger 
classrooms, so much is lost in teaching. 
In a conference, everything is face to 
face, so that very much can be gained. 
I feel that we are in the globes of 
academe, that if students go through 
college, let college go through them. A 
student should show that there is a kind 
of education that goes with a person who 
is fortunate enough to go through col- 
lege. Another one of the biggest changes 
is the lack of guidelines today. I truely 
feel that students are crying out for 
some kind of guidelines. They want to 
be told what is expected of them. Not 
what or how to think but to think. Teach- 
ing has always been my first love. When 
I first started teaching here in 1943, 
there were 300 students. This number 
also included a special group of sol- 
diers who were here as students. I 
remember that at the end of every year, 
we would have a class day. All of the 
classes would participate in putting on 
a type of show. People were invited 
from all over to watch the classes. 
There would be juggling, dancing and all 
kinds of things that meant so much fun. 
In general, most of the changes have 
been very succlusive. almost notnotice- 
able. 

CYCLE: What about the dress of today? 
Miss Tater: That is something very 
difficult for me to understand. There 
isn't any dress code here. You often 
hear that Miss Tater expects students 



to come to class well-dressed. I have 
never said that. I have told them how 
I feel about Levis and dungarees. This 
type of pants are for work or casual 
dress. I don't object to them at alL 
What I sometimes say is, "don't be a 
unisex". I want to be able to tell 
the difference. I don't want you to be- 
come a stamp. I think this type of dress 
narrows your individuality. The students 
are not children. They should be able 
to say "I don't have to follow the 
common herd". They should be able to 
say "If I want to wear a dress and be 
a female, good". Who would want to 
wear pants, when she has a good man, 
is beyond me. 

CYCLE: What are your favorite chil- 
drens' stories? 

Miss Tater: There are many. When I 
tell stories, I try to give a bit about 
the psychology of a human. It's no use 
saying to a little child of six "I want 
you to understand this" if it's beyond 
his or her understanding. Knowing little 
children, they often copy what we tell 
them. Because of this, if we set good 
patterns, they are going to grow up in 
good patterns. One of my favorite stories 
is Winnie the Pooh. My all time favorite 
is a folk tale called "John and the Devil", 
CYCLE: Have you ever written a chil- 
dren's story? 

Miss Tater: No. I haven't. I have many 
of them that I have made up. I just 
don't have the urge to publish. It's bad 
because now-a-days, if youdon'tpublish, 
you perish. 

CYCLE: How was your life as a student 
here? 

Miss Tater: I was a Depression child. 
Both my younger sister and I came here. 
In my freshman year, both my parents 
died. My older brother and sisters kind 
of took over. They told my sister and 
I to come here and get a good college 
education. We both did that. After here. 
I wen*, to Harvard for Graduate work 
and my sister did her Graduate work 
at B. U. While here as a student, it 
was joyful. We never had any spending 
money, but I still had a wonderful time.. 
There were only about 100 students from 
each class. I remember going to parties 
and proms and all. It was very nice. 

The "Cycle" staff would like to thank 
Miss Tater for being the very sweet 
and kind person that she is in giving us 
her time for this interview. All com- 
ments are welcome!! Write John George, 
c/o "Cycle". Leave the letter in "Cycle" 
office or mailbox in mailroom. 



The following verses are exerps from a 
poem not written by protesting college 
students but by men of the First Air 
Cavalry in Vietnam: 

We shoot the sick, the young, the lame, 
We do our best to kill and Maim, 
Recause the kills all count the same, 
Napalm sticks to kids. 

Drop some napalm on the barn, 
It won't do too much harm, 

Just burn off a leg or arm, 
Napalm sticks to kids. 



To Everyone! 

Thanks For Being A 

Really Great Audience For 

The John Sebastian 
Concert. You Were All 
Super Cooperative! 

Alice & Rick 



PAGE 6 



CYCLE 



DECEMBER 1, 1972 



What's Happening, Baby? 



Continued From Page One 



Stephen had asked me early on, knowing 
that at the stage of the game the best 
thing was for them to be a group and 
for me to go solo. It was quite a while 
back then and I had to kind of "get it 
on" and go out and sing on my own. 
The joke of it was that I was going to 
be the drummer for the band and I 
play very little drums. 
CYCLE: Do you ever see the other 
members of the "Spoonful"? 
John: Not recently. I saw Zalman about 
nine months ago and Stephen about six 
months ago. 

CYCLE: What is the main difference 
of going solo and being in a group? 
John: There are alot of differences in 
various kinds of scenes. Right now I'm 
still with a group but I feel very much 
in control. If you have a group that knows 
its set and only that set then you're 
stuck with not going with the audience 
and staying with the set. When I'm 
working by myself, I have about 100 





**~ 






^B 


^* 


- ] 










*s ;X 


1 


fl 








I 


1 


Hf 


! * ^ 






I 




\ V* 






1 

■ 


\ 



in-change songs that I can draw from. 
I then try to pick out what the audience 
wants to hear. It's a combination of 
what I want to play and what they want 
to hear. 



CYCLE: What do you feel is the best 
song you have ever written? 
John: I really don't know. Sometimes 
I think its some of the more recent 
things and other times I think it is 
some of the older things. "Magic" is 
a singular tune for me because it was 
one of the first ones that I wrote. It 
was the third song I had ever written. 
That one sort of sticks out because it 
was the first hit and everything. You 
just sit and listen to the radio and say 
"Wow! It's really on there!" 
CYCLE: What do you consider the high- 
point of your career? 
John: Playing for people and that just 
keeps right on going. 
CYCLE: Do you know Woody Allen? 
Did he choose you personally to write 
the music for What's Up, Tiger Lilly? 
John: No, I don't know how that hap- 
pened. I had watched him for years down 
in the Village. He was working as a 
stand-up-comic for a hundred bucks a 
week like everyone else. I don't really 
know what moved him to use me or 
the "Spoonful" for the movie. 
CYCLE: Was Coconut Grove written 
for that mo/ie? 

John : I didn't have the words yet. 
I only had the melody. If you can remem- 
ber, that song in the movie is called 
something else, which is really the music 
for Coconut Grove. When I got the music 
together, we said great background 
music, we'll use this in the movie. 
Later, I got the words and we recorded 
it. The first verse of that song was 
written three years before "The Spoon- 
ful" had begun. About four years later, 
the other verses came and we recorded 
it. 

CYCLE: Do you enjoy being on the road? 
John: I love it'. Our scene is pretty 
well organized. You just don't go out 
there and get crazy. 

CYCLE: Do you still collect puppets? 
John: How did you know that? Wow! 
I started collecting them when I was 
five years old. I don't collect them any- 
more, but I still have my collection. 
CYCLE: Do you plan to do a concert 
with your father? (Note: John's father 
is a classical harmonica player. It's 
really a trip to hear Bach or Beethoven 




on harmonica He's the only person I 
know of who can play classical har- 
monica). 

John: Yes, I want to do that really 
bad. 

CYCLE: Who or what is your biggest 
inspiration for writing your songs? 
John: There's not really one singular 
thing. There are really so many involved. 
CYCLE: Do you feel rock music has 
progressed for the better? 
John: It's progressed in all directions, 
It has degenerated simultaneously. To 
getting better, it's all individual things 
and individual records. One thing is 
really great, then, here comes one 
thing that is really bad. It just keeps 
going that way. The big new group is 
either really bad. It just keeps going 
that way. The big new group is either 
great or you hate them. It's all in- 
dividual things. 

CYCLE: Who are your favorite song- 
writers? 

John: Lowell George is one. Others are 
Old Doc Pamus, Arthur Crudup and 
Hugh Leadbetter who seems to have 
written every song there is, 
CYCLE: Did you ever play in a blues 
band? 

John: Yes. Played on stage, on records, 
with people who just play blues period. 
I love them. 

CYCLE: If you had to do it over, would 
you? 

John: Yes! Right away! I'd stand in line 
waiting. 



people don't ran out and buy your 
records? 

John: People haven't really gone out 
racing to buy my records for a couple 
of years. So far it hasn't affected the 
way the concerts have been going. The 
Four of Us, which was my most recent 
album and not a big seller, was hard 
to get on the air. One half side of the 
record is one song. How many DJ's 
want to play a twenty minute piece. 
After the "Spoonful" broke up, I was 
sitting around for two years wondering 
what to do. I had a bunch of songs I 
had written, so I went out and recorded 
them. People still come up and say 
play this or that old tune. It's kind of 
like rotating crops. People don't get 
tired of them. 

CYCLE: What gave you the idea to write 
Mouoy? 

John: At a point in the "Spoonful" it 
was really syntactical because the money 
was definately there. The "Spoonful" 
had to quit before the money quit. We 
could have hung on for another year 
hating it. We could have made the money 
we had been working toward making. 
The "Spoonful" never made the money 
groups today make. In retrospect, it 
looked like a bigger scene than it really 
was. We had just gotten to the point 
where we could have charged alot of 
money for concerts when we broke up. 

The "CYCLE" Staff would like to thank 
S. G.A. especially Alice Seagull and Rick 
Paula for Setting up this interview. 




CYCLE: What are you going to do when 



mNDCRrrs 




FrrtHBURG 



LEOMIUSTER r-i 
H05PI-ML U 








TrEB*NO*L 

40 WSHINOTN STREET 
lFMNSmWSSKHUSET 



MH«WM>WE. 



UEOMIIJSTER 
CEMTER 



SILVER JEWELRY 
WOODEN TOY'S 
LEATHER BELTS 
PRESSED FLOWER PICS 
KNITWE4R 
H4NGING PUNTERS 

Pottery 
note paper 

PRINTS 

MINMTURE WfTERCOLORS 

PEN ? INK SKETCHES 

CURVED BIRDS 

WCR/WE" 

EW4MEL ON COPPER 

DOLLS 



wsaes 



HOURS 10-5- /1LSO EVENINGS ? WEEKENDS 537-1075 



DECEMBER 1, 1972 



CYCLE 



PAGE 7 



CONCERT REVIEW 



Theater Workshop 



tf 



Salem State Blews 



ji 



by L. ANTIL 

From the outset I would like to state 
that I know next to nothing about music 
except maybe one or two things about 
Baroque and Classical music, (have to 
put that in for my Art of Music teacher- 
she'U tell you I only know one or two 
things). I would also like to state that 
this review is not for the musically 
knowledgeable but for those of you who 
know about as much as I; in totality a 
working knowledge of the on and off and 
volume controls of a stereo. 

In a more serious vein, the concert 
consisted of the Salem State and Fitch- 
burg State College bands with the former 
leading off with the songs, pieces or 
whatever of Bandology, The Pennywhistle 
Song, Concertino for Clarinet ( and Band, 
Tropical Merengue, and selections from 
"Hair". This band was somewhat 
smaller than our own and for this reason 
was handicapped since they had to use 
the seating arrangements meant for our 
band causing their overall sound to be 
somewhat less concentrated. One final 
handicap I might mention was that the 
guest band ate at our gourmet resident 
cafeteria before the concert. 

About the specific pieces themselves 
I cannot say much however there seemed 
much "dissonance" as my music teacher 
might say. Whether this be planned or 
not I cannot venture to say. During the 
first part of the concert I had the fortune 
or misfortune to be sitting among F.S.C. 
bani members while Salem State gave 
their performance and it would be kind 
to say that the former were abit critical 
in a rather condescending manner. But 
then when it was time for our illustrious 
band to play some Salem State boys 
came over and I had the benefit of 
hearing or overhearing some healthy 
criticism on their part. However they 
tended to be a bit kinder possibly due 
to the dampening effect of the close 
proximity of their band director Mr. 
Finnegan.. 



Considering the "selections" (ah, 
found the word) F.S.C. played, I must 
confess that there was not much of that 
dissonance encountered earlier that 
night, possibly because it wasn't meant 
and possibly because they were just 
plain good (I'm really not biased). The 
selections played by F.S.C. included ex- 
cerpts from "Die Meistersinger", 
(however the performance of this Mister 
Singer was hardly dead), African a, Pro- 
cession of the Sardar and Proud Mary. 
You would have really enjoyed the last 
and unfortunately short piece since it is 
contemporary, however I lamented the 
absence of the gyrations of the Ike and 
Tina Turner group, (although our man on 
the drums didn't do such a bad job). 

At this point in the concert both bands 
joined forces for the El Capitan March, 
Second Suite in F, Theme from "Summer 
of '42, and finally Finale from "New 
World Symphony", with the Salem State 
director John Finnegan presiding over 
the first two and Frank Patterson of 
F.S.C, over the latter two pieces. Since 
I had neither Fitchburg State nor Salem 
State band members in my vicinity to 
comment on one anothers performance 
I did the natural, red blooded, all Ame- 
rican thing (no , I did not go to sleep) 
but did the next best thing and formed 
my very own opinion. And folks, I've 
got to give them credit. For two such 
diverse bands to get together is a feat 
in itself let alone performing under the 
direction of two different and possibly 
differing directors. 

This last bit comes at the time the 
"New World Symphony" selection is 
being performed and I find I no longer 
can continue in my previous tone. These 
people are really talented and make me 
feel like two cents-I can't even play the 
typewriter all that well. All I can give 
is a rather ignorant view of something 
I can not understnad which deserves a 
hell of a lot more credit here than my 
limited heart can give. 



******************* 



ATTENTION 

CLUBS 

& 

ORGANIZATIONS 

GROUP PICTURES 

FOR THE YEARBOOK 

WILL BE TAKEN!! 

ALL COLLEGE PERIODS 

ONLY 
THROUGH DEC. 7 

IN THE 
HIGH RISE LOBBY 

THIS IS 
YOURONLY CHANCE 



by JOHN GEORGE 

On November 9, 10 and 11, the Theatre 
Workshop presented play readings of 
Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw, 
Elizabeth the Queen by Maxwell Ander- 
son, Diary of Anne Frank by Francis 
Goodrich and Albert Hackett, Glass 
Menagerie by Tenessee Williams, and a 
one act play call The Rook by Laurence 
Osgood. Also included but not mentioned 
on the program was Elisabeth Upstead 
by Carl Sandburg. 

Pygmalion started the show starring 
Catherine Casey, Susan Mai one, Mary 
Ellen Maher, Yvonne LeGarde, Joan 
Barnes, John Boisvert, John O'SulliVan, 
Elaine Appleton and Larry LeBlanc. This 
was done in a very nice manner with 
fine acting by all. Each character was 
portrayed excellently which set off the 
act and the show on the path of success. 

Elizabeth the Queen followed, starring 
Anne Pustell, David Netzely, and Terri 
Righi. This play was highpoint of the 
night, being even better than The Rook. 
The make-up done Elaine Appleton and 
Dale Strobel and costumes done by Joan 
Barnes were excellent throughout the 
plays, but showed its true potential 
for reaching greatness in Elizabeth. 
The portrayal of Elizabeth by Anne 
Pustell was outstanding. Along with David 
Netzley as Essex and Terri Righi as 
Penelope, they together projected the 
emotional scene of Elizabeth very 
effectively. Elizabeth's movements and 
manner of speech almost had me 
believing that this girl was indeed a 
queen. The conversation between Essex 
and the queen was done so well that 
one could almost feel the pain that 
they were experiencing. Throughout, this 
play was excellent. 

The next act was Diary of Anne Frank 
starring Jane Bergeron. She did a very 
nice job of portraying Anne Frank. The 
message of a young Jewish girl growing 
up in Nazi Germany came across well 
to the audience because of her fine 
talent of acting. This was a sole act 
and it was all up to her to make it 
work. She made this act a very moving 
one. 

The Glass Menageriefollowed starring 
Pat Boyce, Mike Bosse and Terri Righi 
(also in Queen Elizabeth) Laura, 
portrayed by Pat Boyce, was excellent. 
Jim, portrayed by Mike Bosse, and 
Amanda by Terri Righi, were also 
very good. The setting and acting were 
good but somehow the actors failed to 
get the full humor of the play into the 
audience. Alot of the humor did work, 
but not as much as it should have. How- 
ver, they made up for this by pro- 
jecting the more touching moments very 
fully. 



CLASSIFIED 



ATTENTION!!! TWO RABBITS TO BE 
GIVEN AWAY FREE!!! 
Approx. 3 1/2 months old. One black 
and one white with black nose and ears. 
Very large cage included. Contact the 
editor c/o the CYCLE. 



REPEATED BY POPULAR DEMAND 
FANTASTIC RECORD VALUE 

Stereo albums & boxed sets 
Classical, rock, folk, jazz. 
Now only $1.29 to $9.98 
Quantities limited at the 
COLLEGE BOOOKSTORE 



"We are looking for a student to sell 
our 8 track tapes. We are respected 
thoughout the country as producing a 
premium product, have your own thriving 
business. We carry almost 500 selections 
of all types of music. Soul, Pop, Oldies. 
Country & Western. Popular, Etc. If 
you are interested call Melody Re- 
cordings Inc. (201) 575-9430 ask for 
either Mr . Jonas or Mr. Reid." 

FOR SALE***Guitar and Amplifier Call 
Mark 582-6565. 



RIDE NEEDED***Tuesdays - Friday- 
8:00 class--live on Abbot Ave in Fitch- 
burg. Can be picked up in front of 
Fitchburg Bus Garage. Anyone coming 
from Leominster goes right by here. 
Please call: Nadine at 343-4783. 



Next came Elisabeth Upstead starring 
Yvonne LeGarde. Her portrayal of Elisa- 
beth was done very, very well. This is 
a very emotional act and was brought 
across well by Yvonne. One could easily 
see she was putting everything into this 
act that she had. 

After a short intermission, The Rook, 
a one act play followed. The play, 
itself, is very good. The actors made 
it true-to-life. Very good acting by all 
make this an equal or close runner- 
up to the excellent Elizabeth the Queen. 
Coming from a family of chess players, 
I could almost place myself into the 
scene. Chess players, Alf (by David 
Netzely) and Rico (by John O'Sullivan) 
did a fine job. The wives, Edna 
(Kathy Tibbets) and Adelle (Pat Boyce) 
were also excellent. The apathy of Alf, 
the nagging of Edna, the stupidity of 
Adelle, and the troublesome personality 
of Rico brought many humorous, as well 
as serious, moments into this play. The 
actors handled them beautifully. 

Not enough emphasis can be placed 
on the importance of the stage crew. 
If the lighting and sound is off, it can 
ruin a great play. The crew did a great 
job and feel they also deserve honorable 
mention. They are: 

Lighting: Charles Corley 

Stage Crew: Ken Stevens and Tim 
Gulmond 

Props: Joan Barnes and Mary Ellen 
Maher 

Publicity: Nancy Toscano and Sheila 
Palm 

Costumes: Joan Barnes 

Make-up: Elaine Appleton and Dale 
Strobel 

Director: Catherine Casey 

Assistant Director: Susan Malone 
I would like to thank all of the members 
of Theatre Workshop for taking their 
time to perform these plays. I would 
also like to congratulate them for the 
success earned and so well deserved 
for these plays. 



A Home Away 
From Home 



by ELAINE BERGIEL 

The grandeur of dormitory life can 
never be fully understood unless it is 
experienced. Take, for instance, Au- 
thority Dorm. This is its second year 
of yielding to four hundred girls all 
the warmth and protection of home 
especially if the radiators work during 
cold weather and some canoes along 
with air fresheners are readily avail- 
able to residents of ninth-floor corner 
rooms during a rainstorm. And the 
extra luxuries such as elevators are 
comfortably appreciated by all when one 
steps in, pushes the button, and finds 
a metal plate where the inspection stic ker 
used to be. 

But no one despairs, restful sleep can 
always be obtained even during bomb- 
scares because if the stairways are ever 
blown apart every room has its own 
safe exit-as long as the windowscreens 
get removed first. However, one of the 
most enjoyable aspects of Authority 
Dorm is its ability to give that outdoorsy 
feeling; the wind constantly blowing 
through the hallways creating a loud, 
high-pitched whistle which pleasantly 
lulls its residents to sleep. 

But excellent construction isn't all 
the New Dorm has to offer. The white 
walls and black floor were obviously 
meant to radiate a homey atmosphere- 
for a jailbird sentenced to live. Then 
just outside of these motivating rooms, 
another pleasing attribute can be found. 
One can walk through different suites 
to be further aroused by the various 
textures and appealing colors (bright 
red, yellow, green, or royal blue) of a 
wall or ceiling. Now what more stimula- 
tion can a normal college student want? 

Learning is the main reason parents 
send their innocent children to college, 
and the ideal educational conditions pro- 
vided by Authority Hall (especially when 
parietals have ended and males can 
easily come in through a window or 
alarm door) can assure every mother 
that her daughter will leave the dorm 
at Fitchburg State College, satisfied. 



PAGE 8 



CYCLE 



DECEMBER 1, 1972 




#1/, 



Co, 






How many friends of Peter Johnson 
(ex-editor of the CYCLE) were listening 
to the Larry Glick radio show late last 
Monday night when Peter called from 
Florida to discuss his involvement with 
the innovative "Share- A-Home" pro- 
gram for the elderly? If you didn't 
happen to catch the show that night I' 11 
pass along Peter's "hello" to all his 
friends in this area. 

Trying to go through life with apositive 
attitude is a worthy endeavor, but futile 
for me. How can a sane person keep a 
positive attitude when: 

-the Sheriff of Boston decides to take 
revenge upon the prisoners in the Charles 
Street Jail who rioted last week by 
stalling the re-installation of broken 
windows through our first snowstorm of 
the season and the several cold days 
following: (that'll teach 'em, right 
sheriff: 

-Christmas lights are turned on two 
w»eks before Thanksgiving Day at the 



NatickMall. (What'cha gonna buy me for 
$$mas?) 

-When I cut a full day of classes 
because my windshield wipers wouldn't 
function in our first snowstorm.. .left 
my car in the garage all day...and the 
damn things still don't work! 

-When, at my own sister's wedding 
reception the priest made passes at 
my fiance, (quote: "I don't mean that 
in an earthly way...") 

-The Pope makes speeches from Rome 
about the Devil being afoot in the United 
States. (Lest we forget Watergate: "the 
devil made me do it!") 

Hello, hello, hello I will not be de- 
feated, however, no matter how crazy 
the world around me becomes! "The 
goal of education is not to increase 
knowledge but to create possibilities for 
a child to invent and discover, to create 
men who are capable of doing new 
things." 
Jean Piaget. Thanks, Jean. HUCK 



IT COULD HAPPEN! ! ! 

THE MINING OF THE SEACOAST AROUND MASSACHUSETTS 

KtTuOVERN APPOINTED AMBASSADOR TO MASSACHUSETTS 

MASSACHUSETTS WILL SECEDE FROM THE UNION ' 

MASSACHUSETTS WILL BE CUT OFF FROM THE REST OF THE COUNTRY, 

FLOATED OUT INTO THE MIDDLE OF THE ATLANTIC OCEAN AND SUNK!!! 

MASSACHUSETTS COULD DECLARE WAR ON THE UNITED STATES, LOSE, 

AND BECOME THE WEALTHIEST NATION IN THE WORLD WITH THE 
FINANCIAL AID NIXON WILL GIVE US. 

EVERY ABLE BODIED PERSON FROM MASSACHUSETTS WILL BE THE 

FIRST TO GO WHEN THE ESCALATION OF THE WAR STARTS AGAIN. 

THESE ARE THE OUTLANDISH THINGS THAT MIGHT HAPPEN IN THE 
4 YEARS WITH NIXON 

SERIOUSLY 
THOUGH 

LET IT BE KNOWN: 

THAT THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GOOD AND EVIL; THE 
SACREDNESS OF HUMAN LIFE; AND HOW COMMON SENSE WAS USED;- 
ALL OF THIS WAS REALIZED BY THE MAJORITY OF THE VOTERS OF 
MASSACHUSETTS AND THE DISTRICT OF COLOMBIA. 

LET IT ALSO BE KNOWN THAT MASSACHUSETTS AND NEW 
ENGLAND WILL AGAIN BE IGNORED FOR FOUR YEARS AND THE ONLY 
RECOGNITION D.C. WILL GET IT THAT IT IS THE HOME OF THE PRESIDENT. 
I WOULD VENTURE TO SAY THAT, BEING ABOVE IT, MASSA- 
CHUSETTS WILL NOT TELL THE REST OF THE COUNTRY, "I TOLD YOU SO" 
BUT WILL PROBABLY HAVE MANY REASONS TO DO SO DURING THE NEXT 
FOUR YEARS. 



WRITING CLINIC 

This semester the English Department is offering a remedial -developmental 
writing clinic to students. 

I work with students on Monday, 2-4, and Thursday, 2-3, on the second floor 
of Miller Hall. Individual help is offered to students. 

I urge any student who needs or wants to develop his or her writing skills to 
avail himself or herself of this service. Any student may come: those enrolled 
in Freshman Composition who need extra help, upperclassmen who need help, 
or those who write fairly well and want to do better. 

Richard Haber 
English Department. 



AUTHORITY THREE 



by SAM ALONE 

The cigaret- smokers of Authority Three are trying to cut down on their tobacco 
intake. (The cigar-smokers refuse to give in.) The decision came last week, 
when the last section of breathable air was hidden by a cloud of smoke fumes. 

"It wouldn't be so bad," exclaimed Minnie, "But we can't even see the exit 
through this fog." 

"Never mind the exit," I grumbled. "I'm trying to find the bathroom!" 

"Sam's right about one thing, though," said Cam. ("Yeah," Fran commented 
in a whisper, "One is her limit."). "We have to get rid of this smoke." 

"What if everyone inhaled at the same time and " 

"Instantaneous death," proclaimed Violet. 

"I've got it! Let's open all the windows." 

"No." answered Fran. "We tried that last week, Herlihy thought we were 
sending them smoke signals." 

"First things first," I interupted. "Everyone who is smoking a cigaret right 
now, put it out." 

"What!!!!!!!!!???!!!" 

"Com' on, you can use gum or something instead." They reluctantly extinquished 
their cancer sticks. 

"Hey," cried Violet. "I can't light the aluminum foil!" 

"Oh, Violet!" sighed Fran. "Take off the foil, then light it." 

"Never mind that--what about this smoke!" I demanded. 

"How about moving it to one of the other floors?" 

"I don't think anyone would appreciate that." said Minnie, who lives on the 
fourth floor. "I say we try the windows again." 

"Okay, then, open the drapes." 

"They are open, Sam." said Violet, pointing to two long black pieces of cloth. 

"I thought they were white." 

"They were." 

"Well, that's alright," Cam said cheerfully. "At least now they match the 
walls and ceiling." 

"And the windows," added Fran. "By the way, they won't open. There's 
too much carbon caked on the handle. It won't budge. 

Well, readers, I put it to you. We need help! Presently, we are completely 
engulfed with fumes. Violet has just passed out on the floor. Her last words were, 
"Just like home." (She lives just across the New York border.) The other girls 
are coughing madly. I'm afraid the end is near--very near. And I still have to 
use the bathroom! 

FILMC^LUMN 



CHEAP SENTIMENT IN THE 
GARDENOFTHE FINZI-CONTINIS 

Give yourself a break and avoid this Academy Award-winning sop. Not only 
do you save $2.50, but Vittorio DeSica's reputation can remain enshrined in your 
head for Bicycle Thief, Shoeshine, Umberto D. Two Women and Marriage: 
Italian Style without having to deal with the old man's current sentimentality 
and romanticism. 

The subject matter of The Garden of the Finzi-Continis holds lots of possibi- 
lities, and could have been the stuff of a great film. Adapted from the autobio- 
graphical novel by Giorgio Bassani, the story concerns the responses of two 
Jewish families in Ferrara, Italy to the coming of Fascism and imminent anni- 
hilation between 1938-43. The Finzi-Cintinis are landed aristocrats who dis- 
dain involvement in the events of the city; the second family is bourgeois, worried 
at the rise of anti-Semitism, but deeply divided and contradictory about the Fas- 
cist government. The families are joined through the abortive love affair of young 
Giorgio for Micol Finzi-Contini. 

Sounds good. Even made me want to go see it. Might deal intelligently with 
class differences, styles, contradictions, and the origins of fascism in Italy. 
Bo Widerberg's Adalen 31 and Joseph Losey's The Go-Between both skillfully 
used romantic adventures between classes to illuminate and personalize histo- 
rical circumstances. But Garden of the Finzi-Continis fizzles from the start 
with cheap cinematic and dramatic tricks that combine with a curious nostalgia 
for gentility, remoteness and passivity. 

There wasn't a whole lot I liked about Finzi-Continis. The color photography was 
fuzzy and soft like one long dream sequence shot through gauze. Maudlin classi- 
cal music heaves and sighs with impending tragedy throughout. The elder Finzi- 
Continis walk through their walled estate like blissful zombies as DeSica clubs 
you over the head with sweet gentility. 

Micol Finzi-Contini and her younger brother Alberto are near laughable ste- 
reotypes of upper class ennui, dissolute desires and finally debilitating angst. 
De Sica hints at incest between them, and Alberto's homosexual longing for 
(no kidding) a Communist. Later, DeSica lingers on Micol's impassive face as 
she sits naked after making love with the same unaccountably aristocratic Com- 
minist. The implicit contention that the characters' morality directly contri- 
butes to their demise at the hands of the Fascists is just tripe and only adds to 
the soap opera quality of the film. 

The home life of the bourgeois family is more belie vably portrayed, but again 
includes transparently staged and poorly acted scenes that drip with De Sica's 
sentimentality. 

Heavy-handed cinematic devices abound that would be an embarrassment even 
for less well known directors. Zoom shots to six-pointed Jewish stars recur 
again and again; a student brandishes his concentration camp tatoo for the in- 
genuous Giorgio; a Fascist officer in the Finzi-Contini home accidentally smashes 
a beautiful antique; and all the Finzi-Contini servants are clustered about the 
foot of the giant staircase as the family imperially descends into the hands of 
the Fascists. The lugubrious Yiddish lament for the dead at the end of the film 
is simply too much— the effect is cloying bathos that ultimately evokes resent- 
ment at the manipulation in all this. 

But I suspect my disgust with The Garden of the Finzi-Continis comes not so 
much from its cheap tricks and unsubtle characterizations as the sentiment that 
lies behind it. Granted that the historical events of this film occured, and would 
no doubt happen again under similar numbing conditions. But De Sica openly 
lavishes affection on these spoiled characters and their remote life style "before 
the revolution." 

I have no patience with elegies for aristocratic gentility, Jew or gentile. And 
I have no patience with passivity and social aloofness. Perhaps DeSica's is an 
old man's sentiment, wiser and more fully humane than mine. But bourgeois and 
twenty-six, 1 sure as hell can't get behind it. 



DECEMBER 1, 1972 



CYCLE 



PAGE 9 



OPEN EDUCATION 



Comment 



iiiiiwiiMiiiiMiimiimimiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiimimiiimmmiiiimiimi 



by DONNA WRIGHT 

The "Open Classroom" has caused 
much controversy in experimenting with 
new approaches to education. 

Mrs. Mitchell Hyatt, a public school 
educator and Teaching Assistant to the 
Lowell State Graduate School, is a strong 
advocate of the "Open Education" pro- 
gram. She is employed under the Model 
Cities program and conducts her classes 
as "Open Classrooms." 
INTERVIEWER: Mrs. Hyatt, would you 
please tell me about your job as an 
educator? 

MRS. HYATT: I'd be very happy to. I 
work in the Bartlett School Acre Section 
which is the most depressed area of 
schools in Lowell. The Bartlett accomo- 
dates grades kindergarten through the 
ninth. I teach the fifth grade. 

There are two other women who teach 
the fifth grade with me: both women are 
novices. I am the only one in the class- 
room with a Masters in education. 
INTERVIEWER: What is the "Open- 
Classroom?" 

MRS. HYATT: The "Open CJassroom" 
is a place where far more freedom is 
made available to the student in compari- 
son to a traditional classroom. You will 
note that I said available. The "Open 
Classroom" is a privilege and requires 
extensive preparation on the teacher's 
behalf. There is no standard teaching 
outline in this program due to its flexi- 
bility. Each teacher may use a different 
approach if he or she so desires. 

In my class we use contracts. The 
contract is especially designed for each 
student and on each contract there is an 
outlay of the whole day's schedule. If 
a student is capable of working out his 
own schedule then we allow him to do 
so; if we feel he needs guidance then 
we design it for him. The contract offers 
many different activities under each 
subject heading and it can be changed 
if a student provides a just reason for 
wanting to do so. 

The contract is agreed upon first thing 
in the morning and then the student be- 
gins his work. During this time we 
allow stirl^nts to sit in groups and 
help one a.iother. If a student should 
finish his contract and journal earlier 
than the normal morning time alloted 
to him, than he has earned free time. 
Free time is granted after the contract 
is approved by the teacher, whereby one 
of us issues him a colored marker to 
place on his desk while he chooses 
an activity of educational games, puzzles, 
etc. 

The contract work is self-corrected 
and then corrected again by the teacher. 
The grades are; S-satisfai:tory,N -needs 
improvement, and I -unsatisfactory. We 
expect a student to work only to his 
ability. 

INTERVIEWER. With all this freedom 
one would expect a certain amo.int of 
cheating-does this occur? 
MRS. HYATT: Of course. In the begin- 
ning of the year the student doesn't know 
how to handle this kind of freedom; 
particularly if he is from a traditional 
classroom setting. The grade is what is 
"almighty important" to him then. How- 
ever, he soon finds that we don't give 
grades, and that freedom is earned and 
can be retracted if abused. This way 
the student soon realizes that freedom 
of choice is more important than scraping 
for a grade. We only expect him to work 
to his ability. As the saying goes, 
"one man's C is another mai's A." 
INTERVIEWER: If you don't measure 
a pupil's ability through grades than 
how do you measure it? 
MRS. HYATT We measure abilities 
through diagnostic tests given each quar- 
ter. This provides us with a method of 
constant evaluation. This way classwork 
can be re-adjusted according to pro- 
gress. 

INTERVIEWER: What benefits are 
derived from this type of classroom? 
MRS. HYATT: There are numerous 
benefits for both student and teacher. 
The one result that pleases me greatly 
is the reduction of absenteeism. Ob- 
viously our students are finding school 
an enjoyable place to go. It is no longer 
a threatening institution. And believe mc- 
the kids from this area are on their 
own! If they wanted to cut, they would. 
The concept of contracting with a 
student puts him on a greater level 
intellectually and socially. The student 



isn't dictated to, he may choose. This 
results in more interaction between 
student and teacher. I have more time 
to give students individualized help. 
During contracting time everyone is 
working on a different project and as 
I circulate among them I stop and offer 
opinions or give help if it's needed. 

There is also more interaction between 
students. They can work in groups and 
help each other if they so desire. This 
develops a realization of worth between 
people. As a result there are more 
intrapersonal relationships developed in 
this type atmosphere. 
INTERVIEWER: Do you feel it would 
be easier to operate on "Open Educa- 
tion" program in a school such as 
Chelmsford in comparison to Lowell? 
MRS. HYATT: Yes and no. I really 
can't answer that question definitely. I 
student-taught in Chelmsford and there- 
fore can only speculate. However, I do 
believe that all children can be taught 
to respect freedom no matter where 
they're from. The disciplinary measures 
may be different, but the results should 
not. 

It could be that parents would be more 
of an obstacle than the children. The 
parents of the children from Lowell are 
no problem at all when it comes to 
introducing new educational techniques. 
They just don't care: They seem to be 
interested in the discipline problems of 
their children more than any intellectual 
or educational difficulties. 

The parents from Chelmsford are, 
for the most part, educated middle class 
people with time to be concerned about 
their child's education. These people are 
the ones that would be more interested 
in opposing a program like "Open Edu- 
cation." Understand me now- I am not 
saying this is the case with Chelms- 
ford parents; what I am saying is that 
these people would be more likely to 
oppose any program if they felt it was 
not in the best interest of their child- 
ren. 

INTERVIEWER: What happens when a 
student educated in the "Open Class- 
room" during his elementary years 
enters the traditional high school? 
MRS. HYATT: First of all let me 
say this; almost every town or city 
has at least one school that is trying 
"Open Education" methods. And not all 
of them are elementary grades either. 
Many high schools are now using the 
Pass/Fail grading system-and with much 
success I understand. 

So. as much as I can forsee, schools 
all over are changing and the student 
in future years won't be bouncing be- 
tween tradition and revolution. 

In regard to the student now making 
this transition; if he's going from ele- 
mentary "Open Education" to high 
school tradition, than he should have no 
negative affects. His attitude towards 
learning should be better if anything. 
He should also be of an age whereby 
this transition would be better under- 
stood. 

For students making the reverse 
change I say this; young people are 
extremely flexible and can adapt to 
changes more easily than adults realize, 
If high school freedom poses the greater 
problem than we would at least know 
where "Open Education" should begin 
in a student learning career. 



APO Service 
Bulletin Board 



APO now has a service bulletin board 
on the second floor of Edgerly inside 
the door closest to Thompson Hall. 
If you need volunteers for any type of 
service project, you can contact APO 
personnel: 

Charles Corley Mailbox #231 
John Nott Mailbox #826 
Rick Paula Mailbox #866 
Ken Stevens Mailbox #1054 
Dr. Bernstein Psychology Dept. 
and we will gladly put a note about your 
project on our board. We will also have 
a list of APO service projects there, 
to which anyone who cares to come is 
welcome. 



For quite a while I have wanted to 
make my thoughts known concerning life 
and attitudes on this campus, however 
I was always too chicken to do so. 
Lately though I have been noticing that 
others have been writing comment 
columns for the paper so I figured that 
I should try my hand. 

The only real problem I've had is to 
determine where and how to start. This 
problem was solved when I read the 
letter to the editor by J.G. condemning 
someone who is writing under a pen- 
name, and for reading letters to the 
editor. I was somewhat perturbed by 
what I read so I decided to check things 
out. I tried to find out who ChashaChanna 
was and this I managed to do by speaking 
with some of the Cycle staff. Later when 
I confronted her with the fact she did 
admit that Channa was she. She did 
have two comments though; her first 
was anger over the fact that the Cycle 
people (in particular-although they were 
not the only ones) did not bother to 
keep the pen-name secret. Her second 
reason for being angry is that J.G. 
accused her of not using her rightful 
name—implying sort of that she was 
chicken to use her real name. Well for 
the information of J.G. and anyone else 
who might give a care is that Chasha 
Channa is her real name, her other 
name is merely an English language ver- 
sion of it. Now I am not condemning 
J.G., the Cycle or anyone else, and I 
definitely am not singing C.C.'s praises, 
what I am doing though is trying in my 
own small, very untalented way to get 
everyone on this campus together. I 
don't care what faction you might be 
from or who your great grandparents 
might be etc. etc. and so forth, but what 
I do care about is having all of us able 



to cope with everyone and being able 
to accept criticsm from others. How 
in God's name can we scream for peace 
and understanding for the entire world, 
how can we attack one man or various 
groups of men all in the name of 
"PEACE" if we can't even get along 
in this microcosm of society that we 
call F.S.C.? 

If someone has comments on what is 
happening here, than for the sake of 
all that is held dear do not condemn 
that person for the comments. Reply, 
yes, reply to the comments but do not 
indite the one who made them. 

I don't have anything else to say— 
for now at least, however, I do hope 
to be able to continue commenting. If 
anyone has gripes about anything write 
to me care of the campus mail, maybe 
I'll turn into an ombudsman and we 
can work our gripes out together. This 
has been a kind of a hodge-podge of really 
nothingness but I had to get it out of 
me 

From theFirstCircle, this is Nabokov. 



t^v^x^x^-x^x^x^x^x^x^* 



DID YOU KNOW 

that there is rumor of a mandate 

to the faculty that if they are not in 
their proper place at the proper time 
during final exams, that they will be 
docked one month's pay!!!!! 



that the member of a high school 

band was kicked out for "tooting" his 
trombone with a McGovern sticker at- 
tached to it, while President Nixon 
made a visit to his school!!!!!! 



CLEARANCE SALE 
ON YEARBOOKS! 

'70 - $1.00 
'71 - $2.00 

'72 - $3.00 

ALSO 

ORDER YOUR 

73 YEARBOOK 

SENIORS - $1.50 

U NDERCLASSMEN - $3.0 

ORDER A T 

YEARBOOK OFFICE 

LOWER THOMPSON HALL 

ACROSS FROM 

THE BOOK STORE 

MON. & TUES. 

FROM 

8.00 A.M. TO 12.00 NOON 



PAGE 10 



CYCLE 



DECEMBER 1, 1972 



Getting Ready To Take 
The National Teacher Examinations 1972 - 1973 



To help you get ready to take the National Teacher Examinations, we have listed 
on the following pages typical questions asked by other students, and have answered 
them as concisely as possible. 

What are the National Teacher Examinations ? 

Many graduate schools, state departments of education and local school systems 
require teaching applicants to submit scores on the National Teacher Examinations, 
which are administered by the Educational Testing Service of Princeton, New Jersey. 
These examinations are designed to provide objective measurements of the knowledge 
and abilities required of teachers. The tests in the program assess the candidate's 
general academic knowledge, his professional knowledge, and his specialized know- 
ledge for specific teaching areas. 

Who uses the National Teacher Examinati ons ? 

The National Teacher Examinations are used primarily by state and local school 
systems, teacher education institutions, and other agencies concerned with the 
guidance, preparation, certification, and employment of teachers for elementary and 
secondary schools. 

iiany school systems find NTE scores a very useful supplement to college records 
and other credentials submitted by teacher applicants. With experience, school 
personnel administrators learn to interpret properly academic records they receive 
from institutions that prepare many of their beginning teachers. However, these 
subjective interpretations are difficult to apply fairly to graduates of institu- 
tions having differing standards and marking practices. Accurate and fair evalua- 
tions of preservice preparation are even more difficult for applicants from 
colleges whose programs and standards are not well known to employing school 
officials. NTE scores enable school personnel administrators to evaluate the aca- 
demic status of teacher applicants on standardized scales without regard to such 
varying standards. 

Many state school systems use NTE results to add teaching fields to certifi- 
cates previously issued by the state; award grant-in-aid for summer school atten- 
dance to complete fifth-and sixth-year programs; award regular certificates; 
evaluate credentials of applicants with typical patterns of education; obtain 
objective data as a basis for research on the quality of teacher education; renew 
provisional certificates; validate credits earned: a) at unaccredited institutions 
and b) toward special certificates; and in lieu of certain course requirements for 
certification in some fields. 

Colleges and universities use NTE results priraarily to assist in makirg institu- 
tional or program evaluations, in counseling and placing students, and in screening 
applicants for admission to programs of study beyond the baccalaureate level. The 
NTE are also used in the comprehensive examination of seniors completing pre- 
service preparation for teaching. With the recent emphasis on accreditation for 
teacher education, colleges are now using the NTE as a source of objective data in 
support of institutional applications for accreditation by the National Council 
for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). 



Do school systems and graduate schools in Massachusetts require the National 
Teacher Examinations? 

To the best of our knowledge there are only three school systems in Iiassa- 
chusetts that presently require the National Teacher Examinations. These school 
systems are: Boston Schools, Cambridge Schools, and Somerville Schools. Whether 
or not other schools in Massachusetts make use of National Teacher Examinations 
results for hiring or tenure decisions is unknown at this time. Many school 
systems once required the National Teacher Examinations, but over the past few 
years the trend has been to drop them as a requirement, Whether this trend will 
continue or whether it will be reversed, due to a surplus of teachers in the job 
market, can not be determined at this time. 

Very few colleges in biassachusetts still require the National Teacher Examin- 
ations as an admission requirement to their graduate programs. Today the Graduate 
Record Examinations and/or the Miller Analogies are used for graduate school ad- 
mission. 



T eaching Principles and Practice s. This part estimates the candidate's under- 
standing of general concepts and procedures pertaining to the guidance of learning 
in a classroom, regardless of the particular content area. Questions included 
sample topics such as classroom organization and management, organization of 
instructional materials, instructional behavior of teachers, and evaluation of 
classroom procedures. 



The three General education 
general cultural background: 



Pests cover significant aspects of the candidate's 



'■'"ritten English expression . This test provides a measure of two factors 
judged to be of particular significance to teachers: general verbal ability and 
correct use of the English language. It contains questions on granmatical con- 
struction, punctuation, capitalization, word usage, and sentence construction. 

Social Studies, Literature , and Fine Arts . This test furnishes an estimate 

of the candidate ' s cultural development in the liberal arts field named in the 

title. The questions are directed toward measuring broad understanding rather than 
intensive preparation in these fields. 

Scienc e and Mathematics . This test provides an estimate of the candidate's 
general background in the scientific and mathematical fields. The questions 
emphasize an understanding of basic concepts and generalizations in these fields 
which might reasonably be expected of any teacher, regardless of his field of 
specialization. 

What are the Teaching Area Examinations ? 

The Teaching Area Examinations are measures that aid in evaluating the can- 
didate's preparation to teach in their chosen fields. Tests are offered in the 
following teaching fields: 



Art Education 

Audiology 

3iology and General Science 

Business Education 

Chemistry, Physics, and General Science 

Early Childhood Education 

Educational Administration & Supervision 

Education in the Elementary School 

Education of the Mentally Retarded 

Education in an Urban Setting 

English Language and Literature 

French 

German 

Guidance Counselor 



Home Economics 
Industrial Arts Education 
Mathematics 

Media Specialist-Library and Audio- 
Visual Services 

Men's Physical Education 

Music Education 

Reading Specialist-Elementary School 

Social Studies 

Spanish 

Speech Communication and Theatre 

Speech Pathology 

Texas Government 

Women's Physical Education 



Education in the Elementary School is intended for teachers in the general 
field of elementary education, grades one through eight. It contains questions in 
the elementary education content areas of reading and other language arts, mathe- 
matics, social studies, science, art, music, physical education, health, 4 safety. 

Early Childhood Education is intended for those specifically planning to teach 
children below the fourth grade. In addition to stressing the elementary educa- 
tion curriculum areas appropriate for this level, the test includes questions con- 
cerning profrssional information pertinent to teaching young children. 

Reading vpecialist-Elementary School is for candidates with advanced prepara- 
tion in reading instruction at the elementary school level. 

The Media Specialist test consists of questions relevant to this area that are 
applicable to both elementary and secondary level. 

Education of the Mentally Retarded is intended for those specifically planning 
to teach retarded children and youths. 

The remaining Teaching Area Examinations focus on the secondary level. Each 
test samples the candidate's knowledge of the content basic to that particular 
field, the skills -.seded by the teacher to communicate this content effectively in 
the classroom, and the body of professional information unique to that particular 
field. 



What is Fitchburg State College's Policy on the National Teacher Examinations ? 

At Fitchburg State College all teacher education majors must take the National 
Teacher Examinations (Fitchburg State College catalog 1972-1973, p. 26). 

Why are the National Teacher Examinations required ? 

A crucial requirement for accreditation by the National Council for Accredi- 
tation of Teacher Education (NCATE) is that the college should evaluate the 
teachers it prepares. This evaluation should be used to obtain assessments of 
teacher graduate quality, to provide information in order to identify areas in the 
program development. The results of the National Teacher Examinations are 
presently being used by Fitchburg State College in order to satisfy this NCATE 
requirement. 

Why should I_ be concerned about the college's accreditation ? 

Very simply, especially in today's flooded teacher job market, college 
accreditation influences whether or not teacher graduates will be considered for 
jobs . 

What are the parts of the National Teacher Examinations ? 

The National Teacher Examinations provide measures within three major curric- 
ular domains of teacher preparation: general education, professional education, 
and subject- field specialization. The tests are organized into two batteries. 
First, the Common Examinations - designed to measure certain knowledge and 
abilities expected of every teacher; and second, 27 individual Teaching Area 
Examinations - designed to evaluate the candidates' special preparation for specific 
teaching positions. 

What are the Common Examinations ? 

The Common lixaminaiions provide a general appraisal of a prospective teacher's 
basic professional pre^s ration and general academic attainment. The battery con- 
sists of a Professional Education Test and a set of three General Education Tests. 

The Professional Education Test measures achievement in three important 
dimensions of professional studies: 

Psychological Foundations of Education . This part of the Professional Educa- 
tion Test assesses the candidate's understanding of the field of psychology as it 
relates generally to education and specifically to the teaching-learning process. 
I -. includes questions covering such topics as human growth and development; motiva- 
tion; nature and nurture of learning; personality and adjustment; and measurement, 
evaluation, and research. 

Societal Foundations of Education . This part focuses on the candidate's under- 
standing of social factors related to the teaching-learning process and to the 
curriculum. I". includes questions covering such topics as the history and 
philosophy of education, the organization and administration of the American school 
system, the school and society, and the professional role of the teacher. 



How many item s are on the National Teacher Examinations and what is *he working 
time involved ? 

The following table lists the tests in the NTE Program, together with the 
number of items and the time limit for each test. 

Number of Itedis and Working Time for the NTE Tests 

NTE VESTS NUMBER OF ITEMS 

I. Common Examinations 

A. Professional Education Test 110 



TIME 



90 Minutes 



B. Generii Education Tests 

1. Writer. English Expression .... ^5 JO Minutes 



2. Social Studies, Literature 
and Fine Art3 

3. Science and Mathematics 

General Education Total . 

Common Examinations Total . 
II. Teaching Area Examinations 



65 ho Minutes 

50 35 Minutes 



160 
270 

120-160 



1 hour and 
45 minutes 

3 hours and 
15 minutes 

120 minutes 
each test 



When are the National Teacher Examinations given ? 

There are four nationwide administrations of the examinations, during the 
winter, spring, summer, and fall of each year. The Common Examinations are given 
in the morning and in the early afternoon. The Teaching Area Examinations are 
given in the afternoon, on the same day as the Common Examinations. See the table 
for specific 1972-1973 National Teacher Examinations dates below. 

National Teacher Examinations 1972-1973 Dates 

Examination Dat es Registration Closing Dates 

November 11, 1972 October 19, 1972 



January 27, 1973 

April 7, 1973 

July 21, 1973 



January '4, 1973 

March 15, 1973 

June 28, 1973 



Vhere are the National Teacher Examinations civen ? 

The National Teacher Examinations are administered at hundreds of^ examination 
centers located throughout the country. Fitchburg State College is one of these 
examination centers and the National Teacher Examinations will be given here on 
April 7, 1973. 



DECEMBER 1, 1972 



CYCLE 



PAGE 11 



How do you apply to take the national Teacher Examinations ? 

Every candidate must file a formal application with the Educational Testing 
Service and pay an examination fee. To obtain an application and information on 
the time and places for this year's National Teacher Examinations, see the 
secretary in the Behavioral Science Department (BS 103) • 

How are the scores on the National Teacher Examinations reported ? 

The applicant will receive a report of scores directly from the Educational 
Testing Service. He may also have his scores reported to as many as three school 
systems or colleges without an additional fee. 

What are the examination fees ? 

The following table lists the fees for the National Teacher Examinations: 




Test Combinations 


Pee during regular 
Registration Period 






Pee during late 
Registration Period 


Coninons and Teaching 
Area Examination 




$16.00 






$19.50 


Common 

Examinations only 




$10.00 






$13.50 


Teaching Area 
Examination only 




i 9.00 






$12.50 


Scores reported to extra 
school systems or colleges 




$2.00 


each 




Pee for transfer 
of test date 






$5.00 






How important are the 


scores 


on the National 


Teacher Examinations? 



A candidate's score on the National Teacher Examinations provides the one 
common denominator by which he and applicants from other institutions may be com- 
pared. Therefore, considerable attention is paid to the applicant's performance 
on these tests. However, this does not mean that the scores on the National 
Teacher Examinations are of greater importance for his acceptance by a school 
system or his admission to a graduate education institution than his scholastic 
standing, his letters of recommendation, the reports of committees that have inter- 
viewed him, or his personal qualities and characteristics. 

What is the role of the Evaluation Committee ( Teacher Education Council ) at 
Fitchburg State College ? 

The basic objectives of the Evaluation Committee of the Teacher Education 
Council involve the purpose and future outlook for the National Teacher Examina- 
tions at Fitchburg State College. The Committee reviews past and present results 
in view of its relation to the teacher education program objectives and goals. 
Results are critically analyzed, evaluative procedures and instruments up-dated 
accordingly and additional evaluative techniques suggested and developed as needed. 
The committee's efforts will be published in an annual review. 

How should you prepare for the National Teacher Examinations ? 

There are Score-High Exam Books specifically designed to help candidates pre- 
pare for the National Teacher Examinations. These books and other useful informa- 
tion can be found at the Fitchburg State College library. See the bibliography 
below. 

Cowles Book Co. Editors. How to Pass N and E Teaching Area Examination : Early 
Childhood Ed. Cowles Book Co. Inc., N. Y., 196?! 

Cowles Book Co. Editors. How to Pass N and E Teaching Area Examination : Ed . in 
the Elementary School . Cowles Book Co. Inc., N. Y. , 19613 

Cowles Book Co. Editors. Preparations for national Teachers Examinations . Coroaon 
Examinations . Cowles Book Co., Inc., N. Y . , 1967 

Gruber, Edward C. National Teacher Examination Teaching Area Examination : Ed. in 
the Elementary School . Arco Publishing Co., Inc. N. Y., 1967 

Gruber, Edward C. How to Score High on the National Teachers Examination . Arco 
Publishing Co., N. Y., 196^ 

Gruber, Edward C. National Teacher Examination : Teaching Area Examination : Early 
Childhood Education . Arco Publishing Co., Inc. N. Y., N.Y., 19^7 

Rudman, Jack. National Teacher Exams : 12 Volumes . Psychological Foundations of 
Education ; Societal Foundations of Education ; Teaching Principles and Practices ; 
Social Studies , Literature and Fine Arts ; written English Expressions ; Education 
in the Elementary School ( 1-8 ) ; Early Childhood Education ( K-3 ) ; Administration 
and Supervision ; Guidance Counselor ; Library . National Learning Corporation, 
Brooklyn, N. Y., 1967. 

Weinlander, Albertina Abrams. Barron ' s How to Prepare for the National Teachers 
Examinations . Barron's Educational Series, Inc., Woodbury, N. Y., 1971 



Co., N. Y., 1967 



How to Pass National Teacher Examinations . College Publishing 



FREE TAX ASSISTANCE! F.S.C. 

IRS is sponsoring a Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program to provide 
free tax assistance to those who need it. In VITA, members of the community, 
welfare groups, retirement organizations, colleges and universities, religious 
and governmental organizations volunteer to help taxpayers prepare their tax 
returns completely and accurately. These tax assistors will hopefully reach and 
be able to help many individuals, particularly the elderly and those with lower 
incomes. The VITA program can also be used by teachers in adult education 
classes. 



What Would I Have To Do'.' 

You will have to spend some time in 
training to be able to provide this help 
to others. This training will probably 
require two or three days or evenings. 
After that, your commitment to VITA 
would entail your giving up as few or 
as many hours per week as you wish to 
help others with their tax returns. 



W hat Type Qf Training Is Available? 

The VITA materials utilize pro- 
grammed instruction and can provide all 
the training you need. The Internal Reve- 
nue District office will offer a number 
oi VITA training sessions in many loca- 
tions throughout Massachusetts. These 
sessions will be offered shortly before 
and during the 1972 filing period (Decem- 
ber 1, 1972 - April 1, 1973). 

For Further Information: 
Contact Student Personnel Services Of- 
fice. 



PAUL JACOBS - A VERY SUBJECTIVE JOURNALIST 
by John Jekabson / AFS 



Paul Jacobs' days start at 4 a.m. when he sits down to his typewriter in the 
book-lined study of his comfortable Pacific Heights home in San Francisco. 
"I only need four hours of sleep, maybe five, if I've been stoned," Jacobs says, 
patting his black and white cat Julia. 

The disciplined schedule enables Jacobs to produce at a prolific rate. Right 
now he is working on some six projects; two books on police in America, an 
article on police agents for Playboy, several news pieces for Channel 13 in New 
York, plus occasional articles for various intellectual journals on the left. He 
is also set to do an interview of Moshe Dyan for Playboy and start his own TV 
cooking show in New York in January. 

With all this Jacobs still does news stories for San Francisco's Channel 9 
"Newsroom" and speaks on college campuses and at civic meetings. He has 
had over 200 articles published in everything from the Atlantic to Rolling Stone 
and The Realist. Among his seven books are The State of the Union, If Curly 
Jewish? Between the Rock and the Hard Place, and The New Radicals. 

At 53 the shaven-headed Jacobs finds himself something of a television person- 
ality—a celebrity apart from the news he reports. His stories have generated 
controversy because the targets he attacks—the FBI or the Atomic Energy Com- 
mission—have been held sacrosanct by the straight media. A month ago Jacobs' 
sequence on the Public Broadcasting System's "The Great American Dream 
Machine" wasMachine" was abruptly cancelled following a telegram from J. 
Edgar Hoover to PBS President Hartford Gunn. The program introduced three 
former FBI informers (on movement groups) who admitted instigating violence 
that could be blamed on radicals. Eventually the segment was shown, but only 
as a part of a long discussion on "The Freedom and Responsibility of the Press." 

Recently Jacobs taped an interview with Los Angeles police agent Louis Tack- 
wood also for the "Dream Machine". As of yet he doesn't know if it'll be shown 
at all. 

"I never believed in objective journalism," Jacobs says. "My politics are 
radical and I tell people right out front where I stand. My facts are always cor- 
rect and there isn't any covert bias in my stories. Most journalists indulge in 
self-censorship or write to the viewpoint of their audience. But no matter how 
hard they try they deceive the public because they cannot get rid of their un- 
conscious biases." 

At times Jacobs gets story suggestions from the large national magazines, 
but he only writes about subjects he likes— social and political issues. "They 
call me because they know I'll deliver," he says. "Radical journalists are to- 
lerated today even on television. We're put on as tokens to the 'freedom of 
expression' concept." 

However, there is alimit to how much exposure someone like Jacobs can get 
on the airwaves. Last summer he wanted to have his own news program on 
KQED, San Francisco's educational station, but his politics got in the way. 
"The station said my radicalism would stop people from contributing funds, 
and that the audience wasn't ready for my views," Jacobs recalls. 

"Right now I don't see the kind of shows I do on TV bringing about any funda- 
mental changes. You just reinforce people's ideas about what they already be- 
lieve. People come up to me and say, 'I enjoyed seeing you.' What do they mean?— 
that they enjoyed seeing a man with his face eaten away by radiation? or people 
planning killings for the FBI? They still look on you as an entertainer, not a 
newsman." 

Jacobs doesn't foresee much chance for radicals to influence TV because the 
medium is too audience and money conscious. Though his first love is still writing, 
he plans to appear more and more on TV. 

"I can write five articles in the time I do one TV piece. But people just don't 
like to read anymore," Jacobs says. "And most of the time radicals are talking 
to themselves anyway." 

"Our generation grew up with a continuity of radical thought. Older people 
served as my teachers. But World War n and the McCarthy period destroyed 
the continuity. Today we spawn revolutionaries like fruitflies— a new generation 
each year, but each ignorant of what the previous ones had done." 
"at the present there seems to be no radical movement in America, at least 
there isn't any theoretical structure to it. The FSM generation adopted an exis- 
tential view of politics and totally rejected the past and with that, a sense of 
history. This doomed it," Jacobs said. "Now people are searching for a line 
and they pick up the easiest one. That's why groups like the Trots which have 
a set line are getting more people." 



BUILD BEACHES WITH 



BOTTLES 



— Elinor Houldson/AFS 

(AFS) A Rutgers University professor concerned with erosion of shorelines 
has a unique idea which would also cut into the solid waste problem. Dr. Michael 
D. Piburn suggests that crushed glass could be used to stabilize beaches. 

In his recent article in Natural History Magazine, he points out that present 
efforts to combat erosion involve removing sand from bays behind barrier islands 
in order to refill beach areas. Naturally, this procedure endangers a wide variety 
of animal and marine life because these areas are the breeding grounds for clams, 
crabs, some of the flounders, and various kinds of waterfowl. 

Most available sand is too fine in texture to become a stable component, so 
it is soon washed away and the beach again needs to be reinforced. The ad- 
vantage of "artificial sand" is that it can be crushed into any size range. The 
glass fragments, says Dr. Piburn, "would be quickly rounded in the surf, so 
that they would present no danger to people on the beach." He believes the co-^rse- 
ness of the pulverized glass might lead to greater beach stability. 

Comparing costs of dredging natural sand from bay areas to the cost of 
processing and transporting the "glass sand," the professor states the process 
is economically feasible, and— beyond economics- -it would save the valuable 
inshore water tributaries for wildlife. 

We are reaching the point where the only place left to discharge waste is in 
the ocean, so recovery becomes absolutely essential. If we can dispose of part 
of our annual 15 million tons of waste glass, and at the same time protect both 
our shoreline communities and our wildlife, Dr. Piburn' s plan certainly deserves 
serious consideration. 



PAGE 12 



CYCLE 



DECEMBER 1, 1972 



MY IMAGINATION 



by DONNA WRIGHT 

Needless to say, imagination is a 
wonderful thing. My imagination, the 
imagination of Donna M. Wright, is quite 
vivid and often goes on picturesque ti- 
rades in living color. 

One of my favorite fantasies is to 
make animals of people and oftentimes 
I tell the poor soul what I think he 
or she looks like in my mind's eye. 
Most people who associate with me know 
about this queer quirk I have and many 
have already been christened with a 
verbal, or sometimes drawn, caricature 
of themselves. 

One of my best caricatures takes place 
mentally everytime I look upon the face 
of a working associate, Louis J. March- 
esani. Louis is approximately five feet 
eight inches in height andcouldn'tpossi- 
bly weight more than one hundred and 
sixty pounds soaking wet. He is of 
Italian extraction and possesses dark 
hair and dark eyes as well as the olive 
pigment that is sometimes characte- 
ristic of the Italian nationality. 

However, everytime I look at Louis 
I see a baby bald eagle sitting in half 
an egg-shell which is completely cracked 
and ragged around the edge. Louis is 
blinking his dark brown beady eyes 
through huge black horned-rimmed 
glasses. And last but not least, Louis 
has a cute, but large, white linen eye- 
let lace, babies bonnet on his fat round 
head. 

Another pitiful victim of my savage 
imagination is my husband, Mr. Paul 
Wright. Paul has it worst of all because 
I usually cast him as many animals 
depending on what he is wearing, how his 
hair is combed, or even if his mood 
is different. 

Worst of all, I have even imagined 
him as something other than an animal - 
I've imagined him as a vegetable. Yes, 
it's true. My five foot eleven inch, 
two hundred and twenty pound . blue- 
eyed, sandy-brown - haired husband of 
German extraction, a garden greenery! 

This strange vision came to me as 
we were preparing for a wedding. Paul 
had donned his conservative green suit 
with a lighter green shirt and as he 
strode down the hall trying to knot his 
tie, I saw it. A gigantic red-orange 
carrot! This carrot was the funniest 
darn thing you'd ever want to see. 
The fat part of the carrot was on the 
bottom and protruding from here were 
two large clumpy boots with square 
toes and gold buckles. Around the low 

Draft the 
Robot 

In the U.S. government's stride to 
maintain a stable empire, they have tried 
to develope a new kind of soldier, one 
more in harmony with the conditions of 
advanced imperialistic capitalism. They 
think that they have found one — the 
machine. 

Thus far, the Pentagon has spent over 
three billion dollars on the develop- 
ment of an electronic battle fied. One 
development called '-Fave Phantom" 
is a computer guidance system for air- 
craft. After the pilot pushes the ap- 
propriate buttons for tiiis choosen weapon 
and target, the computer automatically 
steers the aircraft to its destination and 
releases the weapon. 

Other automated bombs include the 
"smart bomb" and the TV bomb. The 
"smart bomb" is guided to its destina- 
tion by radar, while the TV bomb has 
a camera in its nose by which it pic- 
tures in on desired targets. 

They don't always work, however, but 
the image of a world-wide American 
robot army seems intensely attractive 
to its proponants, among them Senator 
Goldwater and General Westmoreland. 

In testimony recorded in the October, 
1969 "Congressional Record," West- 
moreland managed to combine the 
breathless delight of a TV commercial 
(instant relief against Communism) with 
the measured cadence of a visionary 
evangelist. "I see battle fields or 
combat areas that are under 24 hour 
surveillance of all types. I see battle- 
fields which we may destroy anything we 
decide on by locating it through instant 
communication and the upmost ap- 
plication^of lethal firepower," intoned 
the General. 



middle of the carrot was a wide brown 
garrison belt and from the high middle 
to the neck was a long skinny dark 
green tie against the beautiful orange 
background. Paul, the carrot, had no 
face except for two teeny bright blue 
eyes shining from the top of the skin- 
ny half of the carrot, and from this 
half came profusive shocks of greene- 
ry. No doubt this was representative 
of my hubby's large mass of curly 
hair which looks like a "Bob Dylan" 
special. Telling Paul of this fantasy was 
a mistake as he felt he was looking 
"pretty good" and all "spiffed-up" for 
the wedding; and as a result he nearly 
choked himsslf to death with his own tie 
upon hearing this revelation. 

My last reported vision is again of 
my husband Paul. It was a hot August 
evening and we were thoroughly enjoying 
the cool refreshing swim in our neigh- 
bor's new built-in pool when, with the 
help of an electronic-insect extermi- 
nator, I imagined the most absurd- 
looking character yet. 

The black light from the exterminator 
made anything that was light in color 
appear luminescent and twice its size 
die to the brightness. So there it was, 
readers, lumbering down the diving 
board and up, up, up, into the air it 
did soar-a giant Baby Huey with the 
whitest triangle diaper you ever did see! 
My husband, as you can tell by now is 
no Tinkerbell, and this black light de- 
finitely did nothing for him. Under the 
pool lights he appeared yellowish, and 
needless to say his light colored swim- 
suit was so bright and immense, that 
is all one saw All he needed was a set 
of huge baby ducky safety pins to make 
the picture complete. 

Laughingly, I told Paul of his newroie 
and as I soared up, up, up, into the 
air and down, down, down, into the cold 
depths of our neighbor's new job, I 
decided I should keep my little talent 
to myself. 



Food, 
Not Bombs 



WASHINGTON, (APRIL 17).. .."In lieu of 
bomb ; ng and killing people in Vietnam we 
should use the equipment in Indochina 
to save lives in the starving nation of 
Bangladesh," stated the presidents of 
four U.S. student organizations. 

"The urgency of the situation in Bang- 
ladesh and the immediate necessity to 
halt the massive killings in Vietnam dic- 
tate that the people of the United States 
stand-up and be heard. 

••Between two and three million people 
nave died in nine months of war, di- 
sease and starvation in what was once 
East Pakistan - now Bangladesh. The 
death tolls are mounting fast while the 
U.S. Insists-on killing thousands of 
people in Vietnam. 

'•The cost for one bombing run by 
one B52 is over $41,000. The cost of 
delivering 44,000 pounds of food in 
Bangladesh is only $1,000. In our opi- 
nion, the ends of justice would be bet- 
ter served by saving lives than taking 
them." 

Represented were the Presidents of 
the U.S. National Student Association, 
National Student Lobby, Student World 
Concern, and the Student National Edu- 
cation Association (Tabankin, Coye, Ha- 
milton, Buress, respectively.) 

"We are pleading with everyone to 
help. The situation is so sick, that 
words cannot express our concern. Sym- 
pathy is not needed; it just won't do. 
The alleviation of the problems in Bang- 
ladesh is going to take cash, plain 
cash," Hamilton added. 

Tabankin furthered "....that funds to 
help save the people of Bangladesh could 
be sent to the Emergency Relief Fund, 
Inc., P.O. Box 1776, Washington, D.C. 
20013" 

Anyone desiring more information is 
urged to call (202) 638-6304 (1012 rth 
St., n.w., Washington, D.C. 20005) on 
the Bangladesh side of the issue. 

Questions about student involvement to 
end the war and bombing should be di- 
rected to (202) 265-9890. 




Helpful 



Hanna 



Have a problem you'd like some help 
with? Drop a line to Helpful Hanna in 
care of the "Cycle". 



Dear Helpful Hanna: 

There is a girl at Fitchburg State I 
would like to ask out. The problem is I 
don't have the money to take her 
anywhere. I'd feel pretty stupid asking 
her to go dutch on the first date. A 
lot of other students must have the same 
problem. What should I do? 
BROKE 

Dear Broke: 

"Anyone for Tennis?" Find out what 
the two of you have in common and take 
it from there. There are a few things 
that don't cost any money. Find out what 
her interests are on. 



HELPFUL HANNA 

In response to "The Desperate Soul" 
in the last issue of Helpful Hanna' s 
column, a few of us heterosexual males 
have combined our efforts to see how 
desperate she and other females on this 
campus are. Of course we are some 
dynamite beautiful cats (just in case 
you wanted to know). In replying to 
Sweetback, Johnna, Hotlips or Buddah, 
place the name on the letter in reply 
in care of box 948 campus mailbox. 
Eat your hearts out no longer, for 



Sweetback, Johnna, Hot lips and Buddah 
have arrived. 

I'm bonified, solitified and qualified 
to do anything your heart can stand, it 
all depends on you. I'm listed in the 
yellow pages all around the world, 24 
experience in loving sweet young girls. 
Sweetback 



I don't know, but I've been told by a 
signifying dipper, that 64,000 weeping 
husbands, been calling me Jo the ripper. 
They say I'm spreading heart break, and 
all types of pain. But all I'm really 
guilty of, is spreading a love type thing. 
Johnna 



If your woman is fine my brother, it's 
gonna be a crying shame, cause if I 
can't control my head, it's gonna be 
a love type thing, if she calls good 
love 69 9 69 

Hot Lips 
Til' I find a deserving queen, I'm goona 
have my fun, Keep on busting out my 
baby, and staying on the run. You know 
I can love you mamma, the way you 
know I should, cause it ain't how good 
I make it baby, it's how I make it 
good. 

Buddah 



PERSONAL 



To whom it may concern: 

Thank you for picking up the tiger 
kittens under the Thompson stairway. 
We found them on the highway but 
couldn't keep them and we felt someone 
who could give them a good home would 
take them. Thanks again. 



Confidential to Baby Dolls: 

It has been known to happen in very 
rare cases. I wouldn't worry myself 
sick about it; but if you're the worrying 
kind, I'd take it easy. 



DEADLINE DECEMBER 



THOSE OF YOU SUBMITTING ARTICLES TO THE "CYCLE" PLEASE TRY TO 
GET THEM IN BEFORE THE DEADLINE OR AT LEAST A DAY BEFORE. MOST 
OF THE ARTICLES AREN'T TYPED SO WE HAVE TO TYPE THEM OURSELVES 
BEFORE 5 O'CLOCK OF THE DEADLINE DAY. IF WE RECEIVE LETTERS 
TO THE EDITOR, THE EDITOR HAS TO ANSWER THE LETTER AND BOTH HAVE 
TO BE TYPED BY OUR ONE TYPIST IF YOU CAN'T GET MATERIAL IN UNTIL 
THE DEADLINE DATE, PLEASE TRY AND HAVE IT TYPED. 

THANK YOU, 

THE "CYCLE" 



************************************* 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
# 
* 
* 
* 

* 
* 
* 

* 
* 

* 

* 
* 

* 



THERMOGRAPHED WEDDING INVITATIONS 
Special Discount to Students 



Master Crafts 
Press 

BUSINESS - OFFICE - SOCIAL 




P O. Box 300 



Fitchburg, Mass 



Tel. 582-6665 
See Wes. I A. Building 



************************************* 



DECEMBER 1,1972 



CYCLE 



PAGE13 



MEMBERSHIP OF FACULTY 
SENATE FOR 1972-73 



BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE 

Dr. Paul Girling 
Dr. A. Or in Leonard 
Dr. Harold Melvin 

BIOLOGY 

Dr. Stanley Dick 

Dr. George Steffanides 

EDUCATION 

Dr. Francis Powers 
Mr. J. Walter Richard 

ENGLISH 

Mr. Colin Bourn 
Miss Irene Miranda 
Mr. Mike Siegel 
Mr. Robert Tapply 

FINE ARTS 

Mr. Frank Patterson 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

Mr. Anthony Feroci 

INDUSTRIAL ART 

Mr. Raymond G. Hoops 
Mr. Walter F. Harrod 
Dr. Edward Martens 

MATHEMATICS 

Mr. Nicholas Copoulos 
Dr. Christian Cosgrove 



MCKAY SCHOOL 

Mr. James Balentine 
Miss Marion Cushman 
Mrs. Margaret McDowell 
Mr. Frank McSherry 
Mr. Charles Panageotes 
Mrs. Helene Riley 
Dr. Mildred Vinsky 

NURSING 

Miss Jane Kerr 

Miss Katharine O'Connor 

Miss Elizabeth May 

PHILOSOPHY 

Dr. Walter Jeffko 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Mr. William Saville 

SOCIAL STUDIES 

Mr. Norman Carson 
Dr. Muriel McAvoy 
Dr. Caroline Murphy 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Mr. Louis G. Frank 
Dr. William Brown 

INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA 

Dr. Norman O. Locke 

EXECUTrVE OFFICERS 

President-Colin Bourn 
Vice-President-Norman Carson 
Secretary-Kay O'Connor 



by MAUREEN MCCARTHY 

Our thoughts were fused with our hearts 

Into one being. 

We were liberated in our skeleton, , 

and we ran and laughed and worked 

together 

As one 

When the room is gone, our skeleton 

will not have 

Faded with the sun. 

It will take on new dimensions. 

It will grow and bud from 

Some greater limb. 

The wind blows away our handsome blossoms 

But the root survives and brings forth 

A new flower. 




"The verses on them say and say, 
The living who came today 
to read the stones and go away... 
tomorrow dead will come to stay." 

from Robert Frost's "To a Disused Graveyard" 

submitted by: 

M. Radziewicz (class of "74") 



WANTED : 

HAVE YOU EVER GOTTEN SCREWED BY THE FITCHBURG MERCHANTS, 
TELEPHONE COMPANY, UTILITY, OR LANDLORD'.' 




Do you remember the old store past the railroad that sold picture postcards, 
two for a nickel? Remember how excited you got when you saved up enough money 
to buy your Mom a cheap plastic planter for Christmas. Today you as an adult 
pass by and look in the window, ' 'Gee, somebody should tear down that old junk 
store. What an eyesore!" 



submitted by: 
M. Radziewicz (class of 74) 



C °* /^\ 

J 'HEN 

JO voc/ 



' V j 





\TElc ml Vo^ , X|/> ^ x ft) 










Mbum 






\ 



When they find out you are a student, do they treat you differently? Do you get 
security deposits back from landlords promptly? Do you know anyone who has 
bought a second hand car that fizzled out after three days? Do you feel that your 
utility rate is a little bit to high? 

The Fitchburg Consumer Protection Service deals with these types of problems 
for the whole Northern Worcester County area. We felt that there was no place 
a consumer could go when he had problems. Our office has just opened full time 
and we need people to be investigators. After a short training period the in- 
vestigators will take complaints and follow them through until a settlement is 
reached. All that is needed is an interest in the area and four hours of free time 
a week. 

Credit is also available for the work on an individual basis. 

Any interested students contact Alice Seagull at S.G.A. or call Dania at Legal 
Aide 51946. 



Were "You" There? 



BEEN LOOKING FOR A PARKING SPACE LATELY AND BEEN HAVING 
TOUBLE (PERUSUAL) IN FINDING ONE WELL YOUR TROUBLES ARE NOW 
OVER! WE NOW HAVE AMPLE PARKING SPACES— ENOUGH FOR 400 CARS. 
THE ONLY HITCH IS THAT WE WILL HAVE TO BE CONTENT WITH WALK- 
ING A SHORT DISTANCE IN ORDER TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THIS LUCKY 
BREAK. THE PARKING IS DOWN AT THE WALLACE CIVIC CENTER AND 
BETWEEN THE HOURS OF 7:45—9:45, AND 12:00—2:00 THERE WILL BE 
A BUS GOING BACK AND FORTH EVERY 10 MINUTES BETWEEN VARIOUS 
POINTS ON THE CAMPUS AND THE CENTER. THE COST OF THIS PROGRAM 
IS $750.00 AND IT IS BEING PAID BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT. USE THE 
SERVICE, PLEASE, OTHERWISE IT MIGHT NOT BE CONTINUED NEXT YEAR. 
DON'T BE AFRAID TO WALK A SHORT DISTANCE, AFTER ALL YOU WILL BE 
PARKING IN A SAFE AREA AND ONE WHERE YOU ARE SURE OF GETTING A 
SPACE 



Hurrah for the good number of students 
who rolled out of bed nine o'clock Wed- 
nesday morning for the "Conference 
Day" meeting of the Special Education 
Department in Weston Auditorium! This 
meeting was suggested and initiated by 
"Some" students. Were "you" there? 

Senator Joseph Ward, guest speaker, 
began the session with discussion of 
Chapters 750 and 766. Those of you who 
have never heard of 750 or 766 would 
have benefitted more from his twenty 
minute explanation of the legislation than 
from the sleep you gained. He briefly 
explained that Chapter 750, enacted in 
1961, provides 13,000 emotionally dis- 
turbed youngsters with mandatory care, 
rehabilitation and education. Under this 
la>v. such a child may be sent to any 
one of the best schools in the United 
States, at the state's expense. With up 
to $9,000 being spent per annum per 
child, in a school such as Brown, the 
cost is astronomical. Ward is advocating 
services within the commjnity - with a 



redirection of funds, such a cost might 
not be greatly reduced, but programs 
would be improved. 

Chapter 766 (The Bartley-Daly Special 
Education Bill) does not take effect 
until September 1, 1974. However, it is 
important to become familiar with the 
law's major provisions as soon as 
possible. One of the changes affects 
the nomenclature considerable, in that 
labels (trainable, educable) will be 
removed. With emphasis on keeping a 
child under optimum conditions - in 
his own home, with attendance in regular 
classes and schools - indications point 
to the fact that ' -every' ' teacher ' ' should' ' 
have expertise in the field of special 
education. These laws "will" affect your 
roles as teachers. 

Concerned? You should be! Confused? 
Nine faculty members expressed a con- 
cern and i willingness to talk with you 
about matters such as these. If you 
missed the meeting, take a walk over 
to Edgerly - third floor - make your- 
self known! 



PAGE 14 



CYCLE 



In-Depth Study Of Middle East Crisis 



DECEMBER 1,1974 



by MICHAEL SIEGEL 

In completion of our joint doctoral 
dissertation. Jerry Gephart and I spent 
over a year in studying the Arab and 
Israeli propaganda campaigns in Ame- 
rica. This kind of in-depth study can 
be most revealing in any attempt to 
understand the central concerns of the 
Middle East crisis and the mentalities 
of the conflicting parties which help 
explain this human tragedy. 

The study of Arab and Israeli pro- 
paganda revealed 8 basic issues of 
contention between the two groups. These 
include: claims to Palestine, refugees, 
controversy over the Six-Day War, 
boundaries, Jerusalem, the Arabs in 
Israel, negotiations, and the balance 
of power. Each of these issues reflects 
an overall area of contention, rather 
than specific events of a given time. 

The question of claims to Palestine 
is based on historical and religious 
arguments of both groups. The Israelis 
have relied on a convenant with God, 
while the Arabs have cited their 
occupation of Palestine as justification 
for their control of the Holy Land. 
The Israelis counter this by citing their 
own habitation of Palestine, in addition 
to the fact that the only time Palestine 
was a sovereign land was when the 
Israelis controlled it. The Israeli re- 
ligious argument is countered by the 
Arab belief that they are part of the 
"seed of Abraham" and that modern 
Israelis are not descendants of the Jews 
of the ancient Middle East, but are 
Western Europeans who are really out- 
siders. 

WHERE IS HOME? 



The problem of refugees has been the 
most consistently visible barrier to the 
resolution of this crisis. Charges and 
counter-charges have been heard from 
the spokesmen of both sides. In essence, 
each blames the other for the existence 
of this dilemma. The Arabs charge that 
the very creation of Israel caused many 
Arabs to flee their homes and become 
forgotten casualties of the new Israeli 
state. Arab charges further cite the 
Israelis for the refugee problem which 
occurred after the Six-Day War. As the 
Israelis occupied the Gaza Strip and the 
West Bank, say the Arabs, hundreds 
of thousands of Palestinians were dis- 
placed from their homes. The Israelis 
respond to all of this by indicating that 
Arab attacks against the new State of 
Israel in 1948 was the real cause of 
the refugee problem. Further, Arab 
belligerency in 1967 is blamed for the 
War and its aftermath of human tragedy 
in the form of Palestinian refugees. 
Basically, the Israelis take the position 
that a realistic acceptance of Israel 
from the beginning would have avoided 
the refugee problem that now exists. 
Further, the Israelis argue that the 
refugees are used by the Arab states 
as political pawns and that they, the 
Israelis, have done more for the refugees 
than their Arab brothers. They cite the 
40,000 refugees who now work pro- 
ductively in Israel as an example. 

The controversy over the June, 1967 
was has been another prolonged issue. 
Neither side accepts responsibility for 
the outbreak of the war and, at the same 
time, blames the other. The Arabs charge 
that Israel was first to attack with its 
aircraft. They say that Israeli bombs 
hit on Arab soil without warning or 
justification. As a result, the Arabs 
were placed in the position of having 
to forcefully defend their homelands as 
a result of Israeli aggression. The 
position of the Jewish State is that the 
Arabs first carried out an act of war. 
This aci was the blockade of the Gulf 
of Aquaba, the source through which 
important supplies for Israel were 
shipped. They also point out that a 
blockade of this kind has been historically 
considered to be an act of war. The 
Israelis respond to the Arab position 
that they had every right to blockade 
their own waters by pointing out that 
the agreement after the 1956 hostilities 
allowed for free passage by Israeli 
ships. Israeli rhetoric also cites the 
massing of tanks by the Egyptian army 
on the Sinai as a direct threat of war, 
necessitating a defensive response by 
Israeli forces. 



The issue of acceptable boundaries has 
exacerbated the Middle East crisis. The 
Arabs insistthat Israel remove its forces 
from the areas occupied as a result of 
the June war; the Israelis persist in 
their belief that no withdraw) can be 
made before direct negotiations and a 
long-range settlement with the Arabs. 
The Israelis support this position on 
the basis of their previous experience 
in the 1956 hostilities. At that time, 
they did agree to withdraw, a decision 
which was supported by the United States 
and the international community. It 
became apparent to the Israelis, how- 
ever, that this support was not carried 
out as originally intended, thus resulting 
in their decision not to withdraw until 
direct peace with the Arabs is obtained. 
The Arabs characterize this Israeliposi- 
tion as warlike and expansionist in 
nature. They insist that the lands now 
occupied by the Israelis belong to the 
Arabs, and no peace can occur until 
these lands are returned. Israel responds 
to this by referring to these territories 
as necessary to the defense of Israel, 
at least until permanent boundaries are 
established. Even then, say the Israelis, 
there cannot be a return to the prewar 
boundries. 

TRI-JERUSALEM 

Jerusalem has become a highly emo- 
tional issue in the Middle East crisis. 
Its significance as a holy city and 
place of reverence in the three major 
religions inevitably leads to a highly 
charged emotional context. Basically, the 
Arabs support their position that the 
old section of the city be returned to 
the Arabs on the basis of its Arab 
nature. It was part of the Kingdom of 
Jordan before the Six-Day War and 
should be returned to that status now. 
The Arabs also hold to the position that 
Jerusalem has deep religious signifi- 
cance for them and should not be con- 
trolled by the Israelis. Jewish ties with 
Jerusalem are generally well under- 
stood by the American public. The 
Israelis have developed their argument 
for retention of the Holy City on this 
basis. Beyond the generally acknow- 
ledged ties of the Jewish people to 
Jerusalem, the Israelis point out that 
when Jerusalem was under Arab rule, 
Jewish people were barred from visiting 
their holy places including the most 
holy, the Wailing Wall. Now, say the 
Israelis, all three major religions have 
access to their holyplaces in Jerusalem, 
and not just the Arabs. They go on to 
argue that Jerusalem is the most holy 
Jewish city, while it is the third most 
holy city for the Arabs, after Medina 
and Mecca. 

The controversy over Arab citizens of 
Israel has been based on Arab charges 
that they have been treated as "second- 
class citizens." It is emphasized in Arab 
• rhetoric that Israel is inherently a 
Jewish state and her Arab citizens are 
therefore treated as a secondary popu- 
lation. Israeli Arabs, say such charges, 
do not have the same rights as Jewish 
citizens of Israel. In their counter of 
such arguments, the Israelis state that 
no Arab country has given its citizens 
the same opportunities as exist for 
Israeli Arabs. It is pointed out that 
their economic status is higher than that 
of any Arab country. In addition, say 
the Israelis, the only discrimination 
against Arab citizens is that they are 
not required to join the Israeli army. 
This policy exists because it would be 
unfair to force Arabs to fight their own 
"Brothers." However, Arabs may 
volunteer to join the Israeli armed 
forces, if they so desire. 

The question of negotiation shas been 
a highly sensitive area of difference 
between the two sides. Arab policy in 
this regard has supported the interven- 
tion of a neutral third party (Gunnar 
Jarring, for example) to attempt to reach 
a compromise solution to the conflict. 
They have adamaitly refused to discuss 
the crisis directly with the Israelis. 
The Arabs say that they will not discuss 
anything with the Jewish state until such 
time as Israeli forces are removed from 
the occupied areas. The Israelis are 
characterized as invaders and illegal 
trespassers into the territory of other 
sovereign states. In such a situation, 
the Arabs feel that they cannot discuss 



their differences with the Israelis 
directly. Another factor may be that 
the Israelis would be coming to the 
bargaining table from a position of 
strength, as things now stand. The Arabs 
already lost a military battle and cannot 
afford to lose diplomatically. Therefore, 
they may feel that the returning of the 
occupied areas to the Arab nations 
involved would create a more even- 
handed atmosphere. The Israeli position 
on this issue directly contradicts that 
expressed by the Arabs. They insist 
on direct negotiations before any land can 
be negotiated or returned. The Israeli 
argument is that the return of these 
lands would create the identical situation 
which caused hostilities twice before 
(1956 and 1967). Thus, the insistence 
upon the territorial integrity of Israel 
and its right to be a sovereign state 
must be acknowledged by the Arabs 
beofre the Israelis will put themselves 
in a position which makes them sus- 
ceptible as they were before the Six- 
Day War. Thus, the two sides are 
unable to agree even on the forum in 
which the problems they face can only 
be discussed. 

The balance of power in the Middle 
Ease is symbolized in the struggle 
between the United States and the Soviet 
Union for influence. The vast oil interests 
in the Arab world have a direct bearing 
on this dilemma. Since Israel has no 
oil as a resource, the Arabs have a 
strong point in their favor. United States 
policy has consistently been pro-Israel 
since the creation of the Jewish state. 
However, in recent years, the policy 
expressed by this government has been 
one which advocates military balance in 
the area. That is to say that neither 
side should have a military advantage 
over the other, and as a result, the 
United States has been more restrained 
in selling supplies and equipment to 
Israel. In the meantime, however, 
Russian support for the Arabs (parti- 
cularly Egypt) was increasing and this 
situation led to a strain in the friendly 
relations between the U.S. and Israel. 
Arab rhetoric was significant here. As 
they received more Russian aid, the 
Arabs began directing their verbal 
charges toward the Americans instead 
of Israel. They placed the burden of 



responsibility on the United States as 
the major supporter of the Israeli 
government. These charges apparently 
had some effect, since the United States 
then attempted to develop a more mode- 
rate stand in its approach to the Middle 
East. In the midst of this situation, 
the Israelis held firm to their position 
that the only real way to settle the 
crisis was for direct negotiations to 
occur, and an imposed settlement was 
out of the question. In the meantime, 
however, it was vital for Israel to have 
proper military readiness, in the event 
the Arabs started new hostilities. This 
was particularly important since the 
Russians had become more heavily in- 
volved in supplying armaments and 
"advisors" to the military establish- 
ment of Egypt. Thus, the balance of 
power in the area became a major issue 
and one which, said the Israelis, gave 
comfort to the Arabs and their extemism 
because of U.S. vacilation on the crisis. 

INFLUX OF PROPAGANDA 

In studying the effects of the propa- 
ganda efforts of the Arabs and Israelis 
in the United States, we found that 
other factors may have predominated. 
One cannot help considering the cultural 
ties between Israel and the United States 
as a marked influence in the campaigns. 
The Israelis had a ready-made group of 
opinion leaders in the six million Ame- 
rican Jews, who could disseminate the 
case for Israel to the general public. 
This was particularly relevant since the 
Jewish community has a far greater 
percentage of professional and public 
leaders than its numbers call for. In 
addition, the large number of Jewish- 
American organizations are inaposition 
to distribute their message easily. In 
addition, one of the Arab charges has 
been that Jews control much of the mass 
media in America. With such control 
and influence, either through direct 
management or through financial pres- 
sure, the Israeli position becomes more 
easily disseminated to the general popu- 
lation. 

An intricate part of these cultural 
ties is the common religious bond 
between Jews and Christians throughout 
the Western world. The common refe- 
rence to the Old Testament as the ori- 
ginal source of both religious bodies 
makes the process of communication 
more open and empathetic. On the other 
hand, the Arabs must communicate to 
continued on page 15 



AND THEY TELL ME A FRIEND IS DYING. 

by BRUCE W. BOSSELMAN 

Edward A. Smith Jr., 20, of West 
Springfield was killed in a blazing head- 
on crash with a large diesel trailer 
early Sunday morning, July 30th, at the 
North Harwich Bridge over-pass on 
Rte. 6. 

Until now, this tragic event has only 
been brought to the attention of the 
students of F.S.C. by word of mo-rth. 
No article has been written for the 
Cycle, no notices on any bulletin board, 
nothing has been done. Is this all that 
Ed deserves, justafew words in passing? 
I hope not. 

There were only eight people from 
F.S.C. at the funeral. This is under- 
standable since Ed's death was so sudden, 
but does that stop we students from 
showing our concern? Has anybody 
taken the time to find out if anything 
is being done in Ed's memory*? 

I had notices about the Memorial 
Fund that has been set up at the West 
Springfield YMCA, but held off in posting 
them to see if anything was going to be 
done on campus by the Junior Class. 
SGA, or FIAA. It seems everyone has 
forgotten about Ed or just doesn't care. 

If anyone feels that the students at 
F.S.C, would support some type of re- 
memberance. please let me know. I 
hate to see Ed's memory pass without 
any sign of concern from his friends, 
and fellow students. 



DECEMBER 1,1972 



CYCLE 



PAGE 15 



continued from page 14 

the American public as outsiders. In 
other words, they come from a culture 
that has been influenced by Asiatic 
oratory which is highly emotional and 
bombastic, whereas the Israelis are 
influenced by the Western world Attic 
oratory which is more rigid and logical 
in nature. Thus, the cultures of the 
groups involved have been highly in- 
fluential in the propaganda campaigns. 
As an example, the Arab slogan of 
"throw the Jews into the sea" would 
be considered as unacceptable to the 
American people. It was therefore 
necessary to change this kind of rhetoric 
to the more moderate stand of creating 
a 'free democratic Palestine State." 
The Arab mentality of highly emotional 
and feeling-oriented responses to 
situations may be a handicap in dealing 
with Americans who are trained to 
think more '"logically or rationally." 
It is for this reason that Arab pro- 
pagandists have retained American 
public relations firms in recent years. 
This move has helped the Arab case 
to be presented more in line with the 
values and attitudes of the audience-- 
the American people. 

In determining the effect of the pro- 
paganda campaigns, we came' to the 
conclusion that these factors were more 
influential than the messages them- 
selves. It is true that their is a greater 
number of Americans who haveaneutral 
attitude toward the M iddle East, but this 
cannot be attributed to either the suc- 
cess of Arab rhetoric or the failure 
of the Israelis. Previously, there was 
a greater percentage of Americans (on 
the basis of polls) who supported Israel 
outright. Perhaps Arab propaganda has 
had some effect in creating more "neu- 
trals." This, however, cannot be stated 
wkhout reservation since the overall 
American opinion since the creation of 
Israel in 1948 has been pro-Israeli. 
It may be that the Arabs are making 
an attempt that is futile, as they try 
to reach the American public. After all, 
can a legacy of two thousand years really 
be overcome in 25 years???? 



It 



"Mr. President 

Held Over For Four More Years 




BY S. A. MALONE 

In January of 1968, Richard M. Nixon 
opened in the off Broadway production 
"Mr. President". Throughout his 
engagement at the White House, Dick 
received mostly unfavorable reviews 
from the critics. Nevertheless, the 
audience insisted he be signed to a new 
four year contract. What follows is a 
brief summary of Dick's last season 
on stage. 



Oliphant Denver Post 



ACT I: RATION OF INFLATION 



As the curtain rose. Dick was shown 
trying to win over the economy with a 
wage-price freeze. AFL-CIO President 
George Meany criticized this. saying 
"...(there a re) no food controls because 
the President has said food controls 
would require abig bureaucracy". (Since 
1971, fruits, vegetables, grains, poultry 
and livestock have increased in cost 
by over 16%). Complaints also came 
from members of the audience who 
routinely push shopping carts. 




Graysmith San Francisco Cronlcle 



ACT II: NO ENJOYMENT WITH UNEMPLOYMENT 



'Come on . . . now you con do if 



ACT IV: CAMPAIGN WITHOUT STRAIN 





^^ J] 




^^L . ^^^L ', 




r Z 


iff 

Ml ' k 


22 


■\ 


■fefigK 3fi 




























In] Mil - 


■ - Denver 1'nst fl 







In this final act, Dick spent most 
of his time off-stage. The lines were 
covered by a cast of presidential aides 
and advisors. Members of the audience 
who were in big business were invited 
up on stage. They brought with them 
42 million dollars. Representatives of the 
mass media wished that Dick had more 
dialogue in this particular part of the 
show. However, his biggest line was, 



"I am the incumbent". Washington Post 
political specialist David Broder 
complained, "An election is supposed to 
be the time a politician --even a Presi- 
dent—submits himself to the jury of 
the American voters. As a lawyer, 
Richard Nixon knows that if he were as 
high-handed with a jury as he's being 
in this campaign, he'd risk being cited 
for contempt of court". 



. and for you good voters, a copy of my Labor Day 'work eihic' speech 1 ' 

Presidential Assistant JohnD Erlich- 
man entered, stage right. He recited 
simply that unemployment was "down 
to teenage blacks, welfare mothers, and 
folks of that kind.. .people who can't hold 
jobs." While he spoke, a black and white 
backdrop was rolled onstage. It read, 
Rate of unemployment 1968 
Overall 3.5% 

White collar worker 3.2% 
Blue collar workers 2.0% 

The third act, How to Handle a Scandal 
was not listed on the program. Its two 
scenes—The ITT Affair, and Water- 
gate- -were preformed entirely behind 
closed curtains. Periodically, Dickpoked 
his head through the curtain and smiled-- 
with his mouth closed. The audience 
sighed and went out for popcorn. (They 
must have thought it was intermission). 



1972 
5.6% 

5.1% 
3.5% 




Chicago Daily News 



"If I didn't see it with my own eyes, I wouldn't believe it." 




"Ducklnc the issue" 




SPECIAL BOXOFFICE ATTRACTION: VIETNAM 



Even the best of shows have their 
off nights. In order to draw crowds, the 
producers had to think of a gimmick. 
De-escalation no longer excited the 
public, so they had to think of a better 
war attraction. They came up with Fur- 
ther Negotiations for Peace, More Peace 
Talks, New Plans for Peace. But even 
these got a bit tiresome. Just before 
the show closed, they tried Peace is 
Near. That worked wonderfully, so the 
next week they used Peace is Nearer. 
That must have done the trick, because 
here we are and there they are. It's 
the same old show again. I wonder how 
much longer they can use the peace 
gimmick? Well, we'll scon find out. 
The curtain is about to go up 



Peters Dayton Daily News 



PAGE 16 



CYCLE 



DECEMBER 1,1972 



SPORTS 



Outlook Bright For Varsity 
Basketball 



RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES 



by DAVE SETTELE 

Below are listed the current activities 
that are now scheduled for the rest of 
November and December. There will be 
additional programs including such 
activities as skiing, skating, roller 
skating, swimming, cycling, camping, 
back packing, tenting, and various other 
outdoor activities and recreational 
sports. 

Look for lists of activities, times, 
etc., in the lobby of the physical edu- 
cation building, the dorms, the com- 
muters lounge, the women's and men's 



intramural bulletin boards, and the 
CYCLE. 

Most activities will be held with no 
fee necessary or a very nominal fee 
to cover expenses; activities are to 
be provided through partial use of your 
Student Activities and Athletic fees. 

There will always be one activity sche- 
duled a week night plus open-gym for 
all on weekends. Students interested in 
participating with the athletic depart- 
ment in scheduling these various activi- 
ties are urged to contact Mr. Settele. 



SCHEDULE OF ACTIVITIES 

December 2 - Sat. - Open Gym 2:00-5:00 

3 - Sun. - Open Gym 2:00-5:00 

4 - Mon. - Swimming (no charge) Fitchburg YMC A 8:30-10:15 (buses) 

( no charge) 
6 - Wed. - Bowling at Hub Alleys 6:00-8:30 FREE! 

9 - Sat. - Open Gym 2:00-5:00 

10 - Sun. - Open Gym 2:00-5:00 

13 - Wed. - Bowling Hub Alleys 6:00-8:30 FREE! 

16 - Sat. - Open Gym 1:00-5:00 (That's one o'clock ' til five o'clock) 

17 - Sun. - Open Gym 2:00-5:00 

18 - Mon. - Swimming Fitchburg YMCA 8:30-10:15 (buses) (no charge) 



BASEBALL 
1973 



by DICK INGEMIE 

Coach Norm Carson invited all those 
not trying out this past fall season and 
all those whose names appear on the 
following roster to Spring practice in 
March. 

Joe Connors, Dick Ingemie, Dave Mc- 
Dermott, Frank Crossman, Brian Kane, 
Guy Pettoruto, Don Freda, Chuck Kara- 
lekas, Greg Piccuci, Pete Gagnon, 
Howard Klash, Leo Shaughnessey, Steve 
Gould, William Law, Chris Uhl, Fred 
Holder, Mike Marino, Fred Vona, Jim 
Kane, Steve Walkowicz. 

If you did not participate this fall 
or did not sign up you are invited out 
for March. There will be 18 varsity 
uniforms handed out. A turnout of over 
30 players will lead to the implementing 
of a J.V. program. This gives everyone 
playing time and 2nd team players will 
be fed to the varsity throughout the 
season. We have uniforms . equipment and 
coaches, all that's needed is a playing 
committment of 30 or more players. 
This means a full-time committment 
to practices, daily 4-6 once we're out- 
side and to all games which may take 
you out of classes in April and May. 
The J.V. program will not be run with 
part-time players. 



M.I.B. SOCCER 



b.v DICK INGEMIE 

The 1972 soccer season will consist 
of a double-elimination tournament with 
the opening game pitting the defending 
champion Mohawk Go's against the 
Esso's, while the Fenwicks will play the 
Independents. Winners will advance to 
the winner's bracket while the 1st game 
losers will meet in game three. The 
loser of game three will be eliminated 
and the remaining 3 teams will play- 
off. 

Schedules will be posted on the M.I.B. 
board with games played at 3:30 at the 
soccer field. 



SWIM TEAM NOTICE 

To all who answered the call for swim 
team members, we're most grateful. 
We're still contacting and being con- 
tacted by various schools for meets. 
So far so good. 

As far as we know, practices will 
be starting around Christmas, as soon 
as the schedule for practice is finalized 
and approved, it will be printed in the 
paper. We'll also have a meeting with 
the coach. Lou Lorenzen. in the near 
future. 

We'll keep in touch, 
thanks. 

Nancy Morrissey 



CROSS COUNTRY RESULTS 

by DICK INGEMIE 

The M.I.B. cross-country run was held Tuesday November 7th, The course 
traveled from North Street to John Fitch Highway up Pearl Street and back to 
North Street finishing past Weston Auditorium. Four teams ran, walked and maybe 
crawled the distance and here are the top 10 finishers! 

1. Purcell - Fenwicks 

2. Kenny - Mohawks 

3. Tracy - Fenwicks 

4. Karalekras - Freshman Basketball 

5. Bodo - Seals 

6. Hanalan - Mohawks 

7. Phelps - Seals 

8. McCuiness - Fenwicks 

9. Harrington - Mohawks 

10. Matson - Seals 

Team results!'. Lowest points wins!! 
Fenwicks 45 
Mohawks 46 
Seals 58 

Fr. Basketball 65 

The top 22 runners (top 5 of each team) scored the points and the winning team's 
spots of finish were: Bob Purcell 1st, Peter Tracy 3rd. Steve McGuiness 8th, 
Dave Reid 11th and Brian Kane 22nd. 



by CHRIS UHL 

The Fitchburg State Falcon Varsity 
Basketball team is currently involved in 
the task of improving last season's 
disappointing 9-13 record. Last season 
it was felt by both coach and players 
alike, that the season would be most 
successful but academic problems and 
crippling injuries halted what might have 
proved to be the Falcon's most success- 
ful basketball season ever. 

This year, however, the outlook is 
indeed bright again with the Falcons re- 
turning nine lettermen to the twelve man 
team and with needed additional help 
coming from three first year players. 

The Falcons are led by their 6'7" 
high scoring center Steve Ma;jer. Mager, 
who has been the leading scorer for the 
Falcons the past two seasons, will be 
counted on to carry much of the scoring 
load again this year. Mager averaged 
nearly 25 points per game last season 
along with 15 rebounds per game and is 
considered as one of the premier centus 
in the state. 

Joining Mager on the front wall for 
the Falcons will be "high jumping" 
Bill Hackler and Jim Todd. Hackler is 
an excellent shooter and while standing 
but 6' 3" will be able to rebound with 
anyone because of his tremendous leaping 
ability and timing. Jim Todd is also a 
fine shooter and excellent ball handler 
with the ability to get in close to the 
basket for either rebounds or top- ins 
and should be of great service to the 
Falcons this season. 

The back-men for Todd and Hackler 
are Rick Donnelly and Tom Murray, 
both of whom will receive plenty of 



playing time. Donnelly is an excellent 
rebounder and good outside shooter and 
having a year of experience should 
greatly improve his play. Murray is 
probably the quickest of all the forwards 
and may also receive some playing time 
at a guard position as well. 

The guard positions for the Falcons 
will be filled by two of four candidates 
at this moment. Mike Lorden, Rich 
Mirello, Chris Uhl and Doug Ahern are 
currently involved in a fight for starting 
berths which may not be settled even 
as the season begins. Rich Mirello has 
been the mcst impressive in pre-season 
practice and should prove a valuable 
addition to the back-court injecting fine 
shooting and excellent ball handling into 
the Falcon line-up. Mike Lorden and 
Chris Uhl both have been shooting and 
passing well during most of the pre- 
season drills, Doug Ahern is probably 
the most effective outside shooter on 
the squad and while standing 6'3" will 
probably see action at a forward position 
as well. Greg Piccuci and Gene De- 
Camp are two returning varsity guards 
who are currently sidelined with injuries 
but will join the team at a later date. 

The Falcons are putting on the court, 
this season, the strongest team in the 
school's history. The team has 
experience, talent, and a strong desire 
to make this season the best ever. 
The Falcons, based on last year's season 
and scouting reports from around the 
league, are one of the strongest state 
schools and are among the favorites 
to capture the State Conference Champ- 
ionship. 



Fenwicks Capture 2nd Straight 
Football Title 



by DICK INGEMIE 

Dave Reid swing-pass to Brian Kane, 
24 yds., Dave Reid screen pass to 
Brian Kane, 26 yds., touchdown, Brian 
Kane option-pass to Dave Reid, Dave 
Reid pass to John Lewis, touchdown, 
Bob Ware off-guard 5 yds., Brian Kane 
off -tackle 10 yds., and on it went through- 
out the season and the championship. 
Combined with another shutout perfor- 
mance by the defense the Fenwick Blues 
defeated 2nd North of the Dorm 16 - 
for their second straight title and a 
two season record of 19 wins and 
losses. This year's 11-0 record is 
the best ever in M.I.B. play with an 
offensive average of over 30 pts. per 
game and a defensive average of 0.5 
points given up per game. 

Monday's finale was not a run-away 
however. 2nd North trailing 8 - in 
the 2nd half almost scored on a 30 yd. 



pass from Guy Petrullo to Steve Heitz 
but Steve caught the ball just out of the 
end-zone. That would of made it 8 - 6 
with a chance at a tying 2 pt. conversion. 
But after the near miss, the Fenwick 
Blues drove down the field again mixing 
running plays with passing and John 
Lewis scored the clinching touchdown on 
a short pas splay. 

Field conditions, wet and muddy, 
slowed both offenses, but good perfor- 
mances were turned in by Brian Kane, 
John Lewis and Dave Reid for the 
Fenwicks while Steve Heitz and Guy 

Petrullo did the ball moving for 2nd 
North. 

Defensively, Gene DeCamp, John 
Lewis and Dave Reid had interceptions 
while John Pouliot and Jerry Marchia- 
giani handled the line play. For 2nd North 
Guy Petrullo had an interception while 
Doug Robbins made some key stops. 



f— CO*»*<Tion» ON COMTKAtANO